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Voices from the Korean War : Personal Stories of American, Korean, and Chinese Soldiers.

By: Peters, Richard.
Contributor(s): Li, Xiaobing.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2014Description: 1 online resource (310 p.).ISBN: 9780813145938 (electronic bk.); 0813145937 (electronic bk.); 9780813145945 (electronic bk.); 0813145945 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Korean War, 1950-1953 -- Personal narrativesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Voices from the Korean War : Personal Stories of American, Korean, and Chinese SoldiersDDC classification: 951.904 | 951.90428 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Maps; List of Photographs; Abbreviations; Note on Transliteration; Preface; Acknowledgments; Part One. The Korean War: A Short History; 1. Background and Origins of the War; 2. The Opening Phase: South toward Pusan, North to the Yalu; 3. China Enters the War; 4. The Chosin Reservoir Retreat and Advance to the North; 5. Truce Talks and Prison Riots; 6. Trench Warfare and Peace; Part Two. Many Faces, One War; 7. Getting to Korea; 8. A Mortar Man's Story; 9. Escaping the Trap; 10. A North Korean Officer's Story; 11. China's Crouching Dragon; Part Three. Chosin Accounts
12. The Chosin Reservoir: A Marine's Story13. The Chosin Reservoir: A Chinese Captain's Story; Part Four. On the Front Lines; 14. The Hwachon Reservoir Fighting; 15. Life on the MLR; 16. A BAR Man's Story; 17. First Combat; 18. Outpost Harry; 19. A ROK Lieutenant Survives the Bloody Ridges; 20. The Chinese Go Underground; 21. North and South: A Korean Youth Serves in Both Armies; Part Five. Behind the Front Lines; 22. The ""Lighter"" Side of the War; 23. A Korean Housewife's Story; Part Six. POW Camps: North and South; 24. An American Officer Observes the Koje Island Uprising
25. One Week of War, Three Years of Captivity26. A First Sergeant's Experience; 27. Organizing the Riots on Koje: Colonel Zhao's Story; Perspectives on the War; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: ""In three days the number of so-called 'volunteers' reached over three hundred men. Very quickly they organized us into military units. Just like that I became a North Korean soldier and was on the way to some unknown place."" -- from the book South Korean Lee Young Ho was seventeen years old when he was forced to serve in the North Korean People's Army during the first year of the Korean War. After a few months, he deserted the NKPA and returned to Seoul where he joined the South Korean Marine Corps. Ho's experience is only one of the many compelling accounts found in Voices from t.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS921.6 .P37 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vkkc3 Available ocn870589302

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Contents; List of Maps; List of Photographs; Abbreviations; Note on Transliteration; Preface; Acknowledgments; Part One. The Korean War: A Short History; 1. Background and Origins of the War; 2. The Opening Phase: South toward Pusan, North to the Yalu; 3. China Enters the War; 4. The Chosin Reservoir Retreat and Advance to the North; 5. Truce Talks and Prison Riots; 6. Trench Warfare and Peace; Part Two. Many Faces, One War; 7. Getting to Korea; 8. A Mortar Man's Story; 9. Escaping the Trap; 10. A North Korean Officer's Story; 11. China's Crouching Dragon; Part Three. Chosin Accounts

12. The Chosin Reservoir: A Marine's Story13. The Chosin Reservoir: A Chinese Captain's Story; Part Four. On the Front Lines; 14. The Hwachon Reservoir Fighting; 15. Life on the MLR; 16. A BAR Man's Story; 17. First Combat; 18. Outpost Harry; 19. A ROK Lieutenant Survives the Bloody Ridges; 20. The Chinese Go Underground; 21. North and South: A Korean Youth Serves in Both Armies; Part Five. Behind the Front Lines; 22. The ""Lighter"" Side of the War; 23. A Korean Housewife's Story; Part Six. POW Camps: North and South; 24. An American Officer Observes the Koje Island Uprising

25. One Week of War, Three Years of Captivity26. A First Sergeant's Experience; 27. Organizing the Riots on Koje: Colonel Zhao's Story; Perspectives on the War; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

""In three days the number of so-called 'volunteers' reached over three hundred men. Very quickly they organized us into military units. Just like that I became a North Korean soldier and was on the way to some unknown place."" -- from the book South Korean Lee Young Ho was seventeen years old when he was forced to serve in the North Korean People's Army during the first year of the Korean War. After a few months, he deserted the NKPA and returned to Seoul where he joined the South Korean Marine Corps. Ho's experience is only one of the many compelling accounts found in Voices from t.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The Korean War invokes memories for most Americans old enough to recall places such as the Punch Bowl, Heartbreak Ridge, and the Iron Triangle, not to mention the "frozen Chosin." Outside of Donald Knox's two-volume account of the conflict (The Korean War: Pusan to Chosin, 1985 and The Korean War: Uncertain Victory, 1988), no scholar has embarked on an oral history of all the combatants, American, Korean, and Chinese. Finally, Peters and Li (both, Univ. of Central Oklahoma) have sought to bridge the cultural gap with this assortment of interviews that renders a balanced snapshot of the Korean War and its associated horrors. The authors not only offer a fascinating picture of the war, but also provide a concise account of the conflict, from its origins to the armistice signed at Pamunjom. Although the authors occasionally stumble over the complexities of military operations and the lexicon familiar to most military historians, Peters and Li have attempted to enlighten a younger generation about the first Korean War. Let's hope that after reading these Voices, there is no national urge for a second. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and libraries. C. C. Lovett Emporia State University

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