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Rebels on the Border : Civil War, Emancipation, and the Reconstruction of Kentucky and Missouri

By: Astor, Aaron.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Conflicting Worlds: New Dimensions of the American Civil War: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2012Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (343 p.).ISBN: 9780807142998.Subject(s): Kentucky - Politics and government - 1861-1865 | Kentucky -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865 | Kentucky - Race relations - History - 19th century | Kentucky -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Missouri - Politics and government - 1861-1865 | Missouri -- Politics and government -- 1861-1865 | Missouri - Race relations - History - 19th century | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) - Kentucky | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) -- Kentucky | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) - Missouri | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) -- MissouriGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rebels on the Border : Civil War, Emancipation, and the Reconstruction of Kentucky and MissouriDDC classification: 976.903 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; Introduction; 1 Building the Western Middle Ground; 2 In Defense of Slavery and Union; 3 Rebels in Black and White; 4 Holding Kentucky and Missouri for the Union; 5 Dual Rebellion and the Death of Conservative Unionism; 6 Black Soldiers and Regulator Violence; 7 The Perils and Promise of Self-Reconstruction; 8 Remaking the White Man's Democracy; 9 Black Suffrage and the New Political Order; Conclusion; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: Rebels on the Border offers a remarkably compelling and significant study of the Civil War South's highly contested and bloodiest border states: Kentucky and Missouri. By far the most complex examination to date, the book sharply focuses on the "borderland" between the free North and the Confederate South. As a result, Rebels on the Border deepens and enhances our understanding of the sectional conflict, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F455 .A88 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=987416 Available EBL987416

Cover; CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; Introduction; 1 Building the Western Middle Ground; 2 In Defense of Slavery and Union; 3 Rebels in Black and White; 4 Holding Kentucky and Missouri for the Union; 5 Dual Rebellion and the Death of Conservative Unionism; 6 Black Soldiers and Regulator Violence; 7 The Perils and Promise of Self-Reconstruction; 8 Remaking the White Man's Democracy; 9 Black Suffrage and the New Political Order; Conclusion; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

Rebels on the Border offers a remarkably compelling and significant study of the Civil War South's highly contested and bloodiest border states: Kentucky and Missouri. By far the most complex examination to date, the book sharply focuses on the "borderland" between the free North and the Confederate South. As a result, Rebels on the Border deepens and enhances our understanding of the sectional conflict, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The historiography of Reconstruction is filled with accounts of the process of returning the Confederate states to the Union, but Astor (Maryville College) examines an unexplored aspect of Reconstruction--the process of Reconstruction in regions that remained loyal to the Union. Missouri and Kentucky were two of the vital border states--states with legalized slavery that did not secede along with the other slave states in 1861. Although loyal, both states had to undergo the process of eliminating slavery and adjusting their economic/social institutions after the war. This process involved the trying change of granting equal rights and status to former slaves, a process made more difficult by the states' status as members of the victorious side rather than a defeated adversary upon whom legal changes could be forced. Astor presents a well-structured look at the broad changes that affected the two states in the postwar era, especially the social justifications for various political actions. The chapter describing how the states could justify slavery while remaining in the Union is a good example of Astor's well-crafted narrative. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. S. J. Ramold Eastern Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Aaron Astor is assistant professor of history at Maryville College.</p>

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