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Texas Labor History.

By: Maroney, James C.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Centennial Series of the Association of Former Students, Texas A&M University: Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (458 p.).ISBN: 9781603449786.Subject(s): Labor -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Labor -- Texas -- History -- 20th century | Labor movement -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Labor movement -- Texas -- History -- 20th century | Labor unions -- Texas -- History -- 19th century | Labor unions -- Texas -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Texas Labor HistoryDDC classification: 331.8809764 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Chapter 6; Chapter 7; Chapter 8; Chapter 9; Chapter 10; Chapter 11; Chapter 12; Chapter 13; Chapter 14; Chapter 15; Chapter 16; Chapter 17; Chapter 18; Selected Bibliography; Contributors; Index
Summary: Too often, observers and writers of Texas history have accepted assumptions about labor movements in the state-both organized and not-that do not bear up under the light of careful scrutiny. Offering a scholarly corrective to such misplaced suppositions, the studies in Texas Labor History provide a helpful new source for scholars and teachers who wish to fill in some of the missing pieces. Tackling a number of such presumptions-that a viable labor movement never existed in the Lone Star State; that black, brown, and white laborers, both male and female, were unable to achieve even short-term solidarity; that labor unions in Texas were ineffective because of laborers' inability to confront employers-the editors and contributors to this volume lay the foundation for establishing the importance of labor to a fuller understanding of Texas history. They show, for example, that despite differing working conditions and places in society, many workers managed to unite, sometimes in biracial efforts, to overturn the top-down strategy utilized by Texas employers. Texas Labor History also facilitates an understanding of how the state's history relates to, reflects, and differs from national patterns and movements. This groundbreaking collection of studies offers notable opportunities for new directions of inquiry and will benefit historians and students for years to come.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD8083.T4 .T356 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1180047 Available EBL1180047

Front Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1; Chapter 2; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; Chapter 5; Chapter 6; Chapter 7; Chapter 8; Chapter 9; Chapter 10; Chapter 11; Chapter 12; Chapter 13; Chapter 14; Chapter 15; Chapter 16; Chapter 17; Chapter 18; Selected Bibliography; Contributors; Index

Too often, observers and writers of Texas history have accepted assumptions about labor movements in the state-both organized and not-that do not bear up under the light of careful scrutiny. Offering a scholarly corrective to such misplaced suppositions, the studies in Texas Labor History provide a helpful new source for scholars and teachers who wish to fill in some of the missing pieces. Tackling a number of such presumptions-that a viable labor movement never existed in the Lone Star State; that black, brown, and white laborers, both male and female, were unable to achieve even short-term solidarity; that labor unions in Texas were ineffective because of laborers' inability to confront employers-the editors and contributors to this volume lay the foundation for establishing the importance of labor to a fuller understanding of Texas history. They show, for example, that despite differing working conditions and places in society, many workers managed to unite, sometimes in biracial efforts, to overturn the top-down strategy utilized by Texas employers. Texas Labor History also facilitates an understanding of how the state's history relates to, reflects, and differs from national patterns and movements. This groundbreaking collection of studies offers notable opportunities for new directions of inquiry and will benefit historians and students for years to come.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Texas. The name conjures up cliched images of the American frontier and cowboys. Nonetheless, in this well-edited anthology of authoritative original historical essays by a wide variety of remarkable national scholars, distinguished specialists Glasrud and Maroney present illuminating studies exploring Texas labor history over an extended period and over a comprehensive range of relevant subjects. The collection's greatest strength is that the authors recognize the importance of the multiracial southern labor dynamic in a crucial Sunbelt state that, to a significant degree, holds the key to the nation's future. Texas, the second most populous and the second largest of the 50 states, boasts a labor history shaped geographically by sharing a border with the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas. The editors/contributors, who establish the importance of labor to a complete narrative construction of Texas history, show that despite divergent working conditions and places in society, countless workers managed to bond, now and again, in biracial efforts to upend the oppressive top-down approach Texas employers used. This innovative assortment of investigations points the way for new directions of scholarly inquiry and will benefit historians and students for years to come. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. W. T. Howard Bloomsburg University

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