Color Matters : Skin Tone Bias and the Myth of a Postracial America

By: Norwood, Kimberly JadeMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandNew Directions in American History: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2013Description: 1 online resource (540 p.)ISBN: 9781317819561Subject(s): African Americans -- Race identity | Human skin color -- Social aspects -- United States | Race awareness -- United States | Race discrimination -- United States | Racism -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Color Matters: Skin Tone Bias and the Myth of a Postracial AmericaDDC classification: 305.896/073 | 305.896073 LOC classification: E185.625 .C646 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Notes; 1. The Ubiquitousness of Colorism: Then and Now; An International Look at Color; Latin America; Asia; India; China and Japan; The Philippines; Africa; Colorism in Black and White: The United States; Notes; 2. The Origins of Colorism in Early American Law; I: Moving into Colorism and Slavery; II: Toward a Limited Colorism; III: Mixed Ancestry as a Vehicle to Freedom; A: Gobu v. Gobu; B: Hudgins v. Wrights; IV: Color and Freedom; Notes
3. The Rise and Fall of the One-Drop Rule: How the Importance of Color Came to Eclipse RaceThe Importance of Racial Classifications During Slavery; Primary Religious Justifications for Enslavement of Blacks; Enactment of Antmiscegenation Statutes; Constitution Makes Race Necessary for the Census; Distinctions Based on Color of Blacks in the Lower South; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Mobile, Alabama; The Rise of the One-Drop Rule; Methods for Determining Race and the Origin of the One-drop Rule Before the Nineteenth Century
Scientific Theory of Polygenesis and Addition of the Mulatto Category to the 1850 CensusScientific Evidence that Supported the Continued Prevention of Miscegenation after Abolition; Ascendancy of the One-drop Rule; The Civil Rights Movement and the Continuing Need for Racial Classifications; Supreme Court Opinions and Policies and Programs that Reinforced the Importance of Race; Adoption of Directive 15; Fall of the One-Drop Rule; The Supreme Court's Opinions that Deemphasized Race; Deemphasizing the Importance of Race by Rejecting Disparate Impact as the Definition of Discrimination
Deemphasizing the Use of Race by Eliminating the Ability to Employ Racial Classifications in Programs to Dismantle the Effects of DiscriminationImmigration Has Changed the Face and Complexion of American Society; The Multicultural Movement Leads the Federal Government to Abandon the One-Drop Rule; Increasing Numbers of Blacks Reject the One-drop Rule; Conclusion; Notes; 4. A Darker Shade of Pale Revisited: Disaggregated Blackness and Colorism in the "Post-Racial" Obama Era; Introduction; Colorism: A Few Caveats; Changing Notions of Blackness in America: The Obama Example
Skin Tone, Racial Stratification and WealthLight-Skinned Black Elites in the Post-Civil Rights Era; The Rise of Neo-Mulattoes; Implications; Unintentional Racism Based on Skin Tone; Colorism Examples; Two Unscientific Case Studies; Collective Blackness: The Miller Valley Elementary School Incident; The New York Times Magazine and Obama's (Black) People; Conclusion; Notes; 5. Colorism and Interracial Intimacy: How Skin Color Matters; Introduction; Overarching Impact of Skin Color in Racial Impressions; Interracial Intimacy and Marriage in the United States; The Matter of Skin Color
Skin Color and Interracial Intimacy
Summary: In the United States, as in many parts of the world, people are discriminated against based on the color of their skin. This type of skin tone bias, or colorism, is both related to and distinct from discrimination on the basis of race, with which it is often conflated. In Color Matters, Kimberly Jade Norwood has collected the most up-to-date research on this insidious form of discrimination, including perspectives from the disciplines of history, law, sociology, and psychology. Anchored with historical chapters that show how the influence and legacy of slavery have shaped the treatment of skin color in American society, the contributors to this volume bring to light the ways in which colorism affects us all--influencing what we wear, who we see on television, and even which child we might pick to adopt. Sure to be an eye-opening collection for anyone curious about how race and color continue to affect society, Color Matters provides students of race in America with wide-ranging overview of a crucial topic.
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Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Notes; 1. The Ubiquitousness of Colorism: Then and Now; An International Look at Color; Latin America; Asia; India; China and Japan; The Philippines; Africa; Colorism in Black and White: The United States; Notes; 2. The Origins of Colorism in Early American Law; I: Moving into Colorism and Slavery; II: Toward a Limited Colorism; III: Mixed Ancestry as a Vehicle to Freedom; A: Gobu v. Gobu; B: Hudgins v. Wrights; IV: Color and Freedom; Notes

3. The Rise and Fall of the One-Drop Rule: How the Importance of Color Came to Eclipse RaceThe Importance of Racial Classifications During Slavery; Primary Religious Justifications for Enslavement of Blacks; Enactment of Antmiscegenation Statutes; Constitution Makes Race Necessary for the Census; Distinctions Based on Color of Blacks in the Lower South; Charleston, South Carolina; New Orleans, Louisiana; Mobile, Alabama; The Rise of the One-Drop Rule; Methods for Determining Race and the Origin of the One-drop Rule Before the Nineteenth Century

Scientific Theory of Polygenesis and Addition of the Mulatto Category to the 1850 CensusScientific Evidence that Supported the Continued Prevention of Miscegenation after Abolition; Ascendancy of the One-drop Rule; The Civil Rights Movement and the Continuing Need for Racial Classifications; Supreme Court Opinions and Policies and Programs that Reinforced the Importance of Race; Adoption of Directive 15; Fall of the One-Drop Rule; The Supreme Court's Opinions that Deemphasized Race; Deemphasizing the Importance of Race by Rejecting Disparate Impact as the Definition of Discrimination

Deemphasizing the Use of Race by Eliminating the Ability to Employ Racial Classifications in Programs to Dismantle the Effects of DiscriminationImmigration Has Changed the Face and Complexion of American Society; The Multicultural Movement Leads the Federal Government to Abandon the One-Drop Rule; Increasing Numbers of Blacks Reject the One-drop Rule; Conclusion; Notes; 4. A Darker Shade of Pale Revisited: Disaggregated Blackness and Colorism in the "Post-Racial" Obama Era; Introduction; Colorism: A Few Caveats; Changing Notions of Blackness in America: The Obama Example

Skin Tone, Racial Stratification and WealthLight-Skinned Black Elites in the Post-Civil Rights Era; The Rise of Neo-Mulattoes; Implications; Unintentional Racism Based on Skin Tone; Colorism Examples; Two Unscientific Case Studies; Collective Blackness: The Miller Valley Elementary School Incident; The New York Times Magazine and Obama's (Black) People; Conclusion; Notes; 5. Colorism and Interracial Intimacy: How Skin Color Matters; Introduction; Overarching Impact of Skin Color in Racial Impressions; Interracial Intimacy and Marriage in the United States; The Matter of Skin Color

Skin Color and Interracial Intimacy

In the United States, as in many parts of the world, people are discriminated against based on the color of their skin. This type of skin tone bias, or colorism, is both related to and distinct from discrimination on the basis of race, with which it is often conflated. In Color Matters, Kimberly Jade Norwood has collected the most up-to-date research on this insidious form of discrimination, including perspectives from the disciplines of history, law, sociology, and psychology. Anchored with historical chapters that show how the influence and legacy of slavery have shaped the treatment of skin color in American society, the contributors to this volume bring to light the ways in which colorism affects us all--influencing what we wear, who we see on television, and even which child we might pick to adopt. Sure to be an eye-opening collection for anyone curious about how race and color continue to affect society, Color Matters provides students of race in America with wide-ranging overview of a crucial topic.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kimberly Jade Norwood is Professor of Law and Professor of African and African American Studies at Washington University, St. Louis.

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