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Grassroots Warriors : Activist Mothering, Community Work, and the War on Poverty

By: Naples, Nancy A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Perspectives on Gender: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (296 p.).ISBN: 9781317796015.Subject(s): Poor -- United States | Women in community development -- United States | Women in community organization -- United States | Women political activists -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Grassroots Warriors : Activist Mothering, Community Work, and the War on PovertyDDC classification: 305.42/0973 | 305.420973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Part I: Introduction; 1. Women Warriors in the War on Poverty; Part II: The U.S. War on Poverty; 2. Contradictions of New Careers; 3. Community Action in Differing Political Contexts; Part III: Motivations and Inspirations for Community Work; 4. Pathways to Community Work; 5. Activist Mothering, Community Caretaking, and Civic Work; Part IV: The Gendered Politics of Community Work; 6. Dynamics of Race, Class, and Feminist Praxis; 7. Intergenerational Continuity of Community Work
Part V: Conclusion: Lessons for a Renewed War on Poverty8. Shifting Standpoints on Politics and the State; Appendices; Appendix A. Methodological Considerations; Appendix B. A Demographic Profile of the Community Workers Interviewed, 1983-1985; Appendix C. Don't Bother Voting in Poverty Elections, 1966; Appendix D. Amending the War on Poverty; Appendix E. Permissible and Prohibited Activities, PAAC 1966; Appendix F. Map of Philadelphia's Twelve Poverty Areas, 1965; Appendix G. Maximum Participation Movement, Philadelphia 1966; Notes; References; Index
Summary: First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1240.5.U6 N36 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1596650 Available EBL1596650

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Part I: Introduction; 1. Women Warriors in the War on Poverty; Part II: The U.S. War on Poverty; 2. Contradictions of New Careers; 3. Community Action in Differing Political Contexts; Part III: Motivations and Inspirations for Community Work; 4. Pathways to Community Work; 5. Activist Mothering, Community Caretaking, and Civic Work; Part IV: The Gendered Politics of Community Work; 6. Dynamics of Race, Class, and Feminist Praxis; 7. Intergenerational Continuity of Community Work

Part V: Conclusion: Lessons for a Renewed War on Poverty8. Shifting Standpoints on Politics and the State; Appendices; Appendix A. Methodological Considerations; Appendix B. A Demographic Profile of the Community Workers Interviewed, 1983-1985; Appendix C. Don't Bother Voting in Poverty Elections, 1966; Appendix D. Amending the War on Poverty; Appendix E. Permissible and Prohibited Activities, PAAC 1966; Appendix F. Map of Philadelphia's Twelve Poverty Areas, 1965; Appendix G. Maximum Participation Movement, Philadelphia 1966; Notes; References; Index

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Naples's book is a longitudinal study of women community workers hired during the war on poverty. Naples collected oral histories from women who had been active in the program between 1964 and 1974. The central questions the study addresses are the motivations of the women who chose the work; the role the state played in shaping women's community work; how race, class, and gender intersected; and how professionalism and bureaucracy affected women's work. Naples notes that the state's false assumptions about the social disorganization of poor communities play a key role in sustaining poverty. She concludes that analysis of the community work of women in urban environments reveals how "knowledge generated from the standpoint of women living and working outside the dominant framework can provide a more nuanced and tempered understanding of what creates and sustains poverty in America." One hopes this book will serve as a lesson for a renewed "war on poverty." Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. Adamsky; emeritus, University of New Hampshire

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