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They Fought Like Demons : Women Soldiers in the American Civil War

By: Blanton, DeAnne.
Contributor(s): Cook Wike, Lauren.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Conflicting Worlds: New Dimensions of the American Civil War: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2002Description: 1 online resource (294 p.).ISBN: 9780807158555.Subject(s): United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Participation, Female | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Women | Women soldiers -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: They Fought Like Demons : Women Soldiers in the American Civil WarDDC classification: 973.7 | 973.7/082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION: "ENTRENCHED IN SECRECY": Women Soldiers of the Civil War; 1 "THEY FOUGHT LIKE DEMONS": A Military History of Women in Combat; 2 "TO DRESS AND GO AS A SOLDIER": Means and Motivations; 3 "A FINE LOOKING SOLDIER": Life in the Ranks; 4 "FAIRLY EARNED HER EPAULETTES": Women Soldiers in the Military Service; 5 "WHY THEY DETAINED HER I CAN''T IMAGINE": The Prisoner of War Experience; 6 "I WOULD RATHER HAVE BEEN SHOT DEAD": Women Soldiers as Casualties of War; 7 "A CONGENITAL PECULIARITY": Women Discovered in the Ranks
8 "ROMANTIC YOUNG LADIES": Female Soldiers in the Public Consciousness9 WHEN JENNIE CAME MARCHING HOME: Women Soldiers in the Postwar Years; 10 BEYOND HEROES OR HARLOTS: The Changing Historical Perspective; CONCLUSION: "I LOVE MY COUNTRY": A Summation of Women''s Military Service; Appendix: The Female Warrior Bold; Bibliography; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
One week reserve University of Texas At Tyler
Reserves Desk - Circulation
E628 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001857341
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E628 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1598264 Available EBL1598264

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION: "ENTRENCHED IN SECRECY": Women Soldiers of the Civil War; 1 "THEY FOUGHT LIKE DEMONS": A Military History of Women in Combat; 2 "TO DRESS AND GO AS A SOLDIER": Means and Motivations; 3 "A FINE LOOKING SOLDIER": Life in the Ranks; 4 "FAIRLY EARNED HER EPAULETTES": Women Soldiers in the Military Service; 5 "WHY THEY DETAINED HER I CAN''T IMAGINE": The Prisoner of War Experience; 6 "I WOULD RATHER HAVE BEEN SHOT DEAD": Women Soldiers as Casualties of War; 7 "A CONGENITAL PECULIARITY": Women Discovered in the Ranks

8 "ROMANTIC YOUNG LADIES": Female Soldiers in the Public Consciousness9 WHEN JENNIE CAME MARCHING HOME: Women Soldiers in the Postwar Years; 10 BEYOND HEROES OR HARLOTS: The Changing Historical Perspective; CONCLUSION: "I LOVE MY COUNTRY": A Summation of Women''s Military Service; Appendix: The Female Warrior Bold; Bibliography; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

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Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is the story of the approximately 0.0075 percent of Civil War soldiers who were actually women disguised as men. (No women were regularly enrolled in the Civil War armies.) All those who enlisted had to take elaborate measures to deceive their officers as to their true identity. Blanton (National Archives) and Cook (Fayetteville State Univ.) show how the relatively loose structure of Civil War units in the field made such deception possible--sometimes. At other times, the impostors were discovered and almost always summarily dismissed from the service. The authors believe they have found references to some 250 women in the Civil War armies, though names or even aliases are not always available. The authors' purpose is to assert that the women made good soldiers, that they were, for the most part, neither lunatics nor prostitutes, and that it was normal and natural for them to enlist in the army, for the same reasons that men did. As to any broader significance, it is questionable if any firm conclusions can be drawn from a sample that represents only 0.0017 percent of US women at the time of the Civil War. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Specialists. S. E. Woodworth Texas Christian University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>DeAnne Blanton , a senior military archivist at the National Archives, specializes in nineteenth-century U.S. Army records.</p> <br> <p>Lauren M. Cook, special assistant to the chancellor for university communications at Fayetteville State University in North Carolina, is the editor of An Uncommon Soldier: The Civil War Letters of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, Alias Private Lyons Wakeman, 153rd Regiment, New York State Volunteers, 1862-1864</p>

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