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The Papers of Jefferson Davis : June 1865--December 1870

By: Davis, Jefferson.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.The Papers of Jefferson Davis: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (683 p.).ISBN: 9780807158944.Subject(s): Confederate States of America -- History -- Sources | Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 -- Archives | Presidents -- Confederate States of America -- ArchivesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Papers of Jefferson Davis : June 1865--December 1870DDC classification: 973.7 | 973.713 | 973.713092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Introduction; Acknowledgments; Editorial Staff; Editorial Method; Symbols and Abbreviations; Repository Symbols; Contents; Chronology, May 22, 1865-December 1870; The Papers of Jefferson Davis Annotated Documents; 1865; To Charles O'Conor . . . June 7; To Nelson A. Miles . . . June 30; To Varina Howell Davis . . . August 21; From Varina Howell Davis . . . August 31; To Varina Howell Davis . . . October 11-12; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 21-22; To William B. Reed . . . November 26; To C. C. Clay . . . [December]; To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 7-8
To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 30-January 1, 1866Notes . . . [late 1865?]; 1866; To Varina Howell Davis . . . January 24-26; To Varina Howell Davis . . . February 3-4; To Varina Howell Davis . . . March 13-14; To Varina Howell Davis . . . April 8-9; To Margaret Howell Davis . . . May 23; From Joseph E. Davis . . . July 14; To Joseph E. Davis . . . December 17; 1867; From Joseph E. Davis . . . March 26; From Varina Howell Davis . . . [March] 28; From James Lyons . . . May 5; From Judah P. Benjamin . . . May 28; To Jubal A. Early . . . June 8; From Joseph E. Davis . . . June [13]
From Joseph E. Davis . . . June 30To Colin J. McRae . . . July 9; To Joseph E. Davis . . . July 22; To Frank H. Alfriend . . . August 17; To Burton N. Harrison . . . September 4; From Charles O'Conor . . . October 2; From Charles O'Conor . . . October 29; To D. H. Hill . . . December 4; 1868; To James M. Howry . . . February 8; To Margaret Howell Davis, Jefferson Davis, Jr., William Howell Davis, and Varina Anne Davis . . . February 15; To Hugh Robert Davis . . . March 7; To Isaac H. Carrington . . . April 2; From Charles O'Conor . . . April 10; To James M. Mason . . . April 16
From Charles O'Conor . . . April 19To Robert Quld . . . May 2; To Lucinda Smith Boyle . . . June 4; To Howell Cobb . . . July 6; From Joseph E. Davis . . . July 20; To Oscella Harris Blandy . . . August 20; To A. Dudley Mann . . . November 4; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 22; From Charles O'Conor . . . December 7; To Joseph E. Davis . . . December 26; 1869; From Charles O'Conor . . . January 6; To Varina Howell Davis . . . February 7; To Varina Howell Davis . . . February 9; To Thomas C. Reynolds . . . April 18; From Isham G. Harris . . . May 27; To Isham G. Harris . . . June 22
To Varina Howell Davis . . . [July 26]To Varina Howell Davis . . . July 30; To Varina Howell Davis . . . August 9; To Varina Howell Davis . . . August 17; To Alexander M. Clayton . . . September 16; To Varina Howell Davis . . . September 25; To Varina Howell Davis . . . October 15; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 9; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 23; To Mary Elizabeth Mitchell . . . November 30; To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 4; To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 25; 1870; To Alfred A. Blandy . . . January 7; To Varina Howell Davis . . . January 17-18
To Burton N. Harrison . . . March 30
Summary: "Being powerless to direct the current, I can only wait to see whither it runs," wrote Jefferson Davis to his wife, Varina, on October 11, 1865, five months after the victorious United States Army took him prisoner. Indeed, in the tumultuous years immediately after the Civil War, Davis found himself more acted upon than active, a dramatic change from his previous twenty years of public service to the United States as a major political figure and then to the Confederacy as its president and commander in chief. Volume 12 of The Papers of Jefferson Davis follows the former president of the Confederacy as he and his family fight to find their place in the world after the Civil War. A federal prisoner, incarcerated in a "living tomb" at Fort Monroe while the government decided whether, where, and by whom he should be tried for treason, Davis was initially allowed to correspond only with his wife and counsel. Released from prison after two hard years, he was not free from legal proceedings until 1869. Stateless, homeless, and without means to support himself and his young family, Davis lived in Canada and then Europe, searching for a new career in a congenial atmosphere. Finally, in November 1869, he settled in Memphis as president of a life insurance company and, for the first time in four years, had the means to build a new life.Throughout this difficult period, Varina Howell Davis demonstrated strength and courage, especially when her husband was in prison. She fought tirelessly for his release and to ensure their children's education and safety. Their letters clearly demonstrate the Davises' love and their dependence on each other. They both worried over the fate of the South and of family members and friends who had suffered during the war. Though disfranchised, Davis remained careful but not totally silent on the subject of politics. Even while in prison, he wrote without regret of his decision to follow Mississippi out of the Union and of his unswerving belief in the constitutionality of state rights and secession. Likewise, he praised all who supported the Confederacy with their blood and who, like himself, had lost everything.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E467.1 .D2596 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1598275 Available EBL1598275

Cover; Introduction; Acknowledgments; Editorial Staff; Editorial Method; Symbols and Abbreviations; Repository Symbols; Contents; Chronology, May 22, 1865-December 1870; The Papers of Jefferson Davis Annotated Documents; 1865; To Charles O'Conor . . . June 7; To Nelson A. Miles . . . June 30; To Varina Howell Davis . . . August 21; From Varina Howell Davis . . . August 31; To Varina Howell Davis . . . October 11-12; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 21-22; To William B. Reed . . . November 26; To C. C. Clay . . . [December]; To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 7-8

To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 30-January 1, 1866Notes . . . [late 1865?]; 1866; To Varina Howell Davis . . . January 24-26; To Varina Howell Davis . . . February 3-4; To Varina Howell Davis . . . March 13-14; To Varina Howell Davis . . . April 8-9; To Margaret Howell Davis . . . May 23; From Joseph E. Davis . . . July 14; To Joseph E. Davis . . . December 17; 1867; From Joseph E. Davis . . . March 26; From Varina Howell Davis . . . [March] 28; From James Lyons . . . May 5; From Judah P. Benjamin . . . May 28; To Jubal A. Early . . . June 8; From Joseph E. Davis . . . June [13]

From Joseph E. Davis . . . June 30To Colin J. McRae . . . July 9; To Joseph E. Davis . . . July 22; To Frank H. Alfriend . . . August 17; To Burton N. Harrison . . . September 4; From Charles O'Conor . . . October 2; From Charles O'Conor . . . October 29; To D. H. Hill . . . December 4; 1868; To James M. Howry . . . February 8; To Margaret Howell Davis, Jefferson Davis, Jr., William Howell Davis, and Varina Anne Davis . . . February 15; To Hugh Robert Davis . . . March 7; To Isaac H. Carrington . . . April 2; From Charles O'Conor . . . April 10; To James M. Mason . . . April 16

From Charles O'Conor . . . April 19To Robert Quld . . . May 2; To Lucinda Smith Boyle . . . June 4; To Howell Cobb . . . July 6; From Joseph E. Davis . . . July 20; To Oscella Harris Blandy . . . August 20; To A. Dudley Mann . . . November 4; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 22; From Charles O'Conor . . . December 7; To Joseph E. Davis . . . December 26; 1869; From Charles O'Conor . . . January 6; To Varina Howell Davis . . . February 7; To Varina Howell Davis . . . February 9; To Thomas C. Reynolds . . . April 18; From Isham G. Harris . . . May 27; To Isham G. Harris . . . June 22

To Varina Howell Davis . . . [July 26]To Varina Howell Davis . . . July 30; To Varina Howell Davis . . . August 9; To Varina Howell Davis . . . August 17; To Alexander M. Clayton . . . September 16; To Varina Howell Davis . . . September 25; To Varina Howell Davis . . . October 15; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 9; To Varina Howell Davis . . . November 23; To Mary Elizabeth Mitchell . . . November 30; To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 4; To Varina Howell Davis . . . December 25; 1870; To Alfred A. Blandy . . . January 7; To Varina Howell Davis . . . January 17-18

To Burton N. Harrison . . . March 30

"Being powerless to direct the current, I can only wait to see whither it runs," wrote Jefferson Davis to his wife, Varina, on October 11, 1865, five months after the victorious United States Army took him prisoner. Indeed, in the tumultuous years immediately after the Civil War, Davis found himself more acted upon than active, a dramatic change from his previous twenty years of public service to the United States as a major political figure and then to the Confederacy as its president and commander in chief. Volume 12 of The Papers of Jefferson Davis follows the former president of the Confederacy as he and his family fight to find their place in the world after the Civil War. A federal prisoner, incarcerated in a "living tomb" at Fort Monroe while the government decided whether, where, and by whom he should be tried for treason, Davis was initially allowed to correspond only with his wife and counsel. Released from prison after two hard years, he was not free from legal proceedings until 1869. Stateless, homeless, and without means to support himself and his young family, Davis lived in Canada and then Europe, searching for a new career in a congenial atmosphere. Finally, in November 1869, he settled in Memphis as president of a life insurance company and, for the first time in four years, had the means to build a new life.Throughout this difficult period, Varina Howell Davis demonstrated strength and courage, especially when her husband was in prison. She fought tirelessly for his release and to ensure their children's education and safety. Their letters clearly demonstrate the Davises' love and their dependence on each other. They both worried over the fate of the South and of family members and friends who had suffered during the war. Though disfranchised, Davis remained careful but not totally silent on the subject of politics. Even while in prison, he wrote without regret of his decision to follow Mississippi out of the Union and of his unswerving belief in the constitutionality of state rights and secession. Likewise, he praised all who supported the Confederacy with their blood and who, like himself, had lost everything.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Lynda Lasswell Crist has been editor of The Papers of Jefferson Davis since 1979. Suzanne Scott Gibbs has been assistant editor since 2006. Brady L. Hutchison and Elizabeth Henson Smith were assistant editors for the Jefferson Davis Project from 2004 to 2006 and 2003 to 2004, respectively.</p>

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