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Running the River : Secrets of the Sabine

By: Ferguson, Wes.
Contributor(s): Botter, Jacob Croft.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.River Books, Sponsored by The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, Texas State University: Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (162 p.).ISBN: 9781623491277.Subject(s): Boats and boating -- Sabine River (Tex. and La.) | Ferguson, Wes -- Travel -- Sabine River (Tex. and La.) | Sabine River (Tex. and La.) -- Description and travel | Sabine River Valley (Tex. and La.) -- Description and travel | Sabine River Valley (Tex. and La.) -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Running the River : Secrets of the SabineDDC classification: 976.4 | 976.414 LOC classification: F392 .S12 F47 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Contents; Foreword; Introduction; Part I; A Bend in the River; Ignored, but Essential; Born and Raised; Lost Towns; Hidden Fellowship; Part II; In Pursuit of Old Outlaws; The River Rat; Too Much Snake; Meeting Tidwell; The Favored Sister; Diving in Murky Water; A Sheltered Cove; Part III; The Final Journey; Surviving the Stake; Hospitality and Horror; Guru and the Gator; Little Boat, Big Lake; Acknowledgments; Index; Back Cover
Summary: Growing up near the Sabine, journalist Wes Ferguson, like most East Texans, steered clear of its murky, debris-filled waters, where alligators lived in the backwater sloughs and an occasional body was pulled from some out-of-the-way crossing. The Sabine held a reputation as a haunt for a handful of hunters and loggers, more than a few water moccasins, swarms of mosquitoes, and the occasional black bear lumbering through swamp oak and cypress knees.But when Ferguson set out to do a series of newspaper stories on the upper portion of the river, he and photographer Jacob Croft Botter were entranced by the river's subtle beauty and the solitude they found there. They came to admire the self-described "river rats" who hunted, fished, and swapped stories along the muddy water-plain folk who love the Sabine as much as Hill Country vacationers love the clear waters of the Guadalupe. Determined to travel the rest of the river, Ferguson and Botter loaded their gear and launched into the stretch of river that charts the line between the states and ends at the Gulf of Mexico.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F392 .S12 F47 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1604315 Available EBL1604315

Front Cover; Contents; Foreword; Introduction; Part I; A Bend in the River; Ignored, but Essential; Born and Raised; Lost Towns; Hidden Fellowship; Part II; In Pursuit of Old Outlaws; The River Rat; Too Much Snake; Meeting Tidwell; The Favored Sister; Diving in Murky Water; A Sheltered Cove; Part III; The Final Journey; Surviving the Stake; Hospitality and Horror; Guru and the Gator; Little Boat, Big Lake; Acknowledgments; Index; Back Cover

Growing up near the Sabine, journalist Wes Ferguson, like most East Texans, steered clear of its murky, debris-filled waters, where alligators lived in the backwater sloughs and an occasional body was pulled from some out-of-the-way crossing. The Sabine held a reputation as a haunt for a handful of hunters and loggers, more than a few water moccasins, swarms of mosquitoes, and the occasional black bear lumbering through swamp oak and cypress knees.But when Ferguson set out to do a series of newspaper stories on the upper portion of the river, he and photographer Jacob Croft Botter were entranced by the river's subtle beauty and the solitude they found there. They came to admire the self-described "river rats" who hunted, fished, and swapped stories along the muddy water-plain folk who love the Sabine as much as Hill Country vacationers love the clear waters of the Guadalupe. Determined to travel the rest of the river, Ferguson and Botter loaded their gear and launched into the stretch of river that charts the line between the states and ends at the Gulf of Mexico.

Description based upon print version of record.

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