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Ethnic Realities of Mexican Americans : From Colonialism to 21st Century Globalization

By: Urbina, Martin Guevara.
Contributor(s): Vela, Joel E | Sanchez, Juan O.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Springfield : Charles C Thomas, 2014Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (327 p.).ISBN: 9780398087814.Subject(s): Mexican Americans -- Social conditions | Mexican Americans -- Civil rights | Mexican Americans -- Ethnic identity | Mexican Americans -- History | Political persecution -- United States -- History | Racism -- United States -- History | United States -- Ethnic relationsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ethnic Realities of Mexican Americans : From Colonialism to 21st Century GlobalizationDDC classification: 973 | 973.046872 | 973/.046872 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; Chapter 1 ETHNIC CONSTRUCTIONS: THE MAKING OF THE UPCOMING MAJORITY,MEXICAN AMERICANS; Chapter 2 SITUATING CONQUEST, COLONIALISM,SLAVERY, ETHNIC IDENTITY FORMATION,CITIZENSHIP, AND CRIMINAL LAWIN AMERICA; Chapter 3 THE MEXICAN CONQUEST:ETHNIC REALITIES UNDER COLONIALISM; Chapter 4 THE INVISIBLE EMPIRE: MEXICAN AMERICANS AND THE FIERY CROSS, IN THE SHADOW OF THE NIGHT; Chapter 5 MEXICANS, THE KKK, AND RELIGION: THE POWER TO EXCLUDE AND OPPRESS; Chapter 6 CRIMINALIZING MEXICAN IDENTITY:PRIVILEGE, POWER, AND CONTROL OVER TIME
Chapter 7 BORDERS AND DREAMS: THE CHICANO FIGHT FOR EQUALITY AND JUSTICEChapter 8 THE LAST FRONTIER: MEXICAN AMERICANS AND EDUCATION IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM; Chapter 9 MEXICAN AMERICANS IN 21ST CENTURY GLOBALIZATION; AFTERWORD THE FUTURE OF MEXICAN AMERICANS IN THE 21ST CENTURY; APPENDIX WEB, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, AND OTHER INFORMATION CITED; REFERENCES; INDEX; ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Summary: The goal of this book is to examine the ethnic experience of the Mexican American community in the United States, from colonialism to twenty-first century globalization. The authors unearth evidence that reveals how historically white ideology, combined with science, law, and the American imagination, has been strategically used as a mechanism to intimidate, manipulate, oppress, control, dominate, and silence Mexican Americans, ethnic racial minorities, and poor whites. A theoretical and philosophical overview is presented, focusing on the repressive practice against Mexicans that resulted in violence, brutality, vigilantism, executions, and mass expulsions. The Mexican experience under "hooded" America is explored, including religion, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Local, state, and federal laws are documented, often in conflict with one another, including the Homeland Security program that continues to result in detentions and deportations. The authors examine the continuing argument of citizenship that has been used to legally exclude Mexican children from the educational system and thereby being characterized as not fit for the classroom nor entitled to an equitable education. Segregation and integration in the classroom is discussed, featuring examples of court cases. As documented throughout the book, American law is a constant reminder of the pervasive ideology of the historical racial supremacy, socially defined and enforced ethnic inferiority, and the rejection of positive social change, equality, and justice that continues to persist in the United States. The book is extensively referenced and is intended for professionals in the fields of sociology, history, ethnic studies, Mexican American (Chicano) studies, law and political science and also those concerned with sociolegal issues.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.M5 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1650695 Available EBL1650695

CONTENTS; Chapter 1 ETHNIC CONSTRUCTIONS: THE MAKING OF THE UPCOMING MAJORITY,MEXICAN AMERICANS; Chapter 2 SITUATING CONQUEST, COLONIALISM,SLAVERY, ETHNIC IDENTITY FORMATION,CITIZENSHIP, AND CRIMINAL LAWIN AMERICA; Chapter 3 THE MEXICAN CONQUEST:ETHNIC REALITIES UNDER COLONIALISM; Chapter 4 THE INVISIBLE EMPIRE: MEXICAN AMERICANS AND THE FIERY CROSS, IN THE SHADOW OF THE NIGHT; Chapter 5 MEXICANS, THE KKK, AND RELIGION: THE POWER TO EXCLUDE AND OPPRESS; Chapter 6 CRIMINALIZING MEXICAN IDENTITY:PRIVILEGE, POWER, AND CONTROL OVER TIME

Chapter 7 BORDERS AND DREAMS: THE CHICANO FIGHT FOR EQUALITY AND JUSTICEChapter 8 THE LAST FRONTIER: MEXICAN AMERICANS AND EDUCATION IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM; Chapter 9 MEXICAN AMERICANS IN 21ST CENTURY GLOBALIZATION; AFTERWORD THE FUTURE OF MEXICAN AMERICANS IN THE 21ST CENTURY; APPENDIX WEB, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, AND OTHER INFORMATION CITED; REFERENCES; INDEX; ABOUT THE AUTHORS

The goal of this book is to examine the ethnic experience of the Mexican American community in the United States, from colonialism to twenty-first century globalization. The authors unearth evidence that reveals how historically white ideology, combined with science, law, and the American imagination, has been strategically used as a mechanism to intimidate, manipulate, oppress, control, dominate, and silence Mexican Americans, ethnic racial minorities, and poor whites. A theoretical and philosophical overview is presented, focusing on the repressive practice against Mexicans that resulted in violence, brutality, vigilantism, executions, and mass expulsions. The Mexican experience under "hooded" America is explored, including religion, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Local, state, and federal laws are documented, often in conflict with one another, including the Homeland Security program that continues to result in detentions and deportations. The authors examine the continuing argument of citizenship that has been used to legally exclude Mexican children from the educational system and thereby being characterized as not fit for the classroom nor entitled to an equitable education. Segregation and integration in the classroom is discussed, featuring examples of court cases. As documented throughout the book, American law is a constant reminder of the pervasive ideology of the historical racial supremacy, socially defined and enforced ethnic inferiority, and the rejection of positive social change, equality, and justice that continues to persist in the United States. The book is extensively referenced and is intended for professionals in the fields of sociology, history, ethnic studies, Mexican American (Chicano) studies, law and political science and also those concerned with sociolegal issues.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In addressing the ethnic realities of Mexican Americans in the US, Urbina (criminal justice, Sul Ross State Univ.-Rio Grande College), Vela (history, Sul Ross State Univ., Uvalde), and Sánchez examine the historical foundation of white supremacy (ideology) imbedded in US education, laws, and other institutions of power. The authors clearly illustrate how "the Mexican American experience has been neglected, minimized, or excluded from the pages of history" by redefining the time line of US history. Throughout the book, the authors provide examples of the conflicts, struggles, and battles that Mexican Americans face when challenging the dominant white social structure. The authors understand the importance of examining that history, but their overall goal is to provide an "alternative way of analyzing" the Mexican American experience by utilizing literature from many different academic fields, such as critical race/ethnic studies and postcolonial studies. The book is directed toward graduate students and scholars, but this reviewer believes it can be used for upper-division undergraduates. Furthermore, with its wide range of contexts, the book can serve as a starting point in reexamining the history of Mexican Americans in the US in any traditional history, political science, or sociology course. --Luis H Moreno, Bowling Green State University

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