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Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women : Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South

By: Roberts, Blain.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2014Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (378 p.).ISBN: 9781469615578.Subject(s): African American women --Southern States -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Beauty shops -- Social aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Beauty, Personal -- Social aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Black race -- Color -- Social aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Cosmetics -- Social aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Human skin color -- Psychological aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Race awareness -- Southern States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women : Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century SouthDDC classification: 323.1196 | 323.1196/07300904 LOC classification: E185.615Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; ONE. Making Up White Southern Womanhood: The Democratization of the Southern Lady; TWO. Shop Talk: Ritual and Space in the Southern Black Beauty Parlor; THREE. Homegrown Royalty: White Beauty Contests in the Rural South; FOUR. Thrones of Their Own: Body and Beauty Contests among Southern Black Women; FIVE. Bodies Politic: Beauty and Racial Crisis in the Civil Rights Era; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women: Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South
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E185.615 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1655861 Available EBL1655861

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; ONE. Making Up White Southern Womanhood: The Democratization of the Southern Lady; TWO. Shop Talk: Ritual and Space in the Southern Black Beauty Parlor; THREE. Homegrown Royalty: White Beauty Contests in the Rural South; FOUR. Thrones of Their Own: Body and Beauty Contests among Southern Black Women; FIVE. Bodies Politic: Beauty and Racial Crisis in the Civil Rights Era; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

Pageants, Parlors, and Pretty Women: Race and Beauty in the Twentieth-Century South

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

The expression that "beauty is only skin deep" is put to the test in this well-researched examination of women, race, and standards of attractiveness in the 20th-century US. Focusing primarily on the southern US, Roberts (California State Univ., Fresno) uses white beauty pageants and African American beauty parlors as a way of examining race relations from the Jim Crow era to the rise of the modern civil rights movement. The author argues that while white southerners used the stereotype of the "southern belle" to privilege their race (and win multiple Miss America titles during the 1950s and 1960s), African Americans, especially women, were carving out their own racialized safe spaces in beauty parlors across the South. Further, as the civil rights movement began to shake the very foundations of segregation, black beauty parlors were key sites of support for the movement itself. Roberts concludes with a brief discussion of the black power movement and the resulting "black is beautiful" campaign. At the same time, Mary Kay Ash "promised women [that] selling her brand of [white] southern beauty could bring economic liberation," just as decades earlier, Madam C. J. Walker had similar goals for African American women. --Kathleen Banks Nutter, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College

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