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A Daring Venture : Rudolf Hess and the Ill-Fated Peace Mission of 1941

By: Raina, Peter.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Peter Lang AG, Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften, 2014Description: 1 online resource (294 p.).ISBN: 9783035305890.Subject(s): Germany -- Foreign relations -- 1933-1945 | Germany -- Foreign relations -- Great Britain | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- Germany | Hess, Rudolf, 1894-1987 | Nazis -- Biography | Statesmen -- Germany -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Daring Venture : Rudolf Hess and the Ill-Fated Peace Mission of 1941DDC classification: 940.5312092 LOC classification: DD247 .H37Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgements; List of Illustrations; Chapter One A Magnificent Sight; Chapter Two Why did Hess want to speak to the Duke of Hamilton?; Chapter Three The Duke Meets the Reichsminister; Chapter Four The Führer's Rage; Chapter Five Ivone Kirkpatrick Meets Rudolf Hess; Chapter Six Kirkpatrick Meets Hess: Second Interview - Further Peace Proposals; Chapter Seven Kirkpatrick Meets Hess: Third Interview - Additional Conditions; Chapter Eight The Frustrations of the Deputy Führer; Chapter Nine The Hess Case Raised in the House of Commons
Chapter Ten Peace Proposal: Anglo-German Accord, 9 June 1941Chapter Eleven Peace Proposal: Alliance Against Bolshevism, 6 September 1941; Epilogue; Appendices; 1. Letter from Rudolf Hess to Adolf Hitler, 14 June 1941.; 2. Statement by Rudolf Hess on the Roosevelt-Churchill joint declaration of 12 August 1941.; 3. Letter from Rudolf Hess to the Duke of Hamilton, 19 May 1941.; 4. Peace Proposals by Rudolf Hess delivered personally to Lord Beaverbrook, 9 September 1941.; Sources; Index
Summary: At the height of the Second World War, Hitler's Deputy, Rudolf Hess, made a dramatic solo flight to the British Isles. His arrival there was sensational news - and it baffled everyone. Why had he come? Hess claimed he had flown to Britain entirely of his own initiative and was on a personal mission of peace. But so unlikely was the success of such an appeal in Churchill's entrenched Britain that historians continue to wonder at his motives. In this book, Peter Raina publishes, for the first time, complete texts of Hess's 'peace proposals' and a treatise he wrote in captivity outlining how he saw Nazi Germany's role in Europe. These texts throw considerable light on Hess's mission and also on how the Nazi leadership saw their programme of expansion and their relations with Britain. Disconcertingly single-minded and an unashamed disciple of Hitler, Hess was at heart an idealist. His friend and confidant Albrecht Haushofer was an idealist of a different kind, and joined the German Resistance Movement. The frame story of this book relates how the two men moved to their tragic ends.
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DD247 .H37 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1658139 Available EBL1658139

Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgements; List of Illustrations; Chapter One A Magnificent Sight; Chapter Two Why did Hess want to speak to the Duke of Hamilton?; Chapter Three The Duke Meets the Reichsminister; Chapter Four The Führer's Rage; Chapter Five Ivone Kirkpatrick Meets Rudolf Hess; Chapter Six Kirkpatrick Meets Hess: Second Interview - Further Peace Proposals; Chapter Seven Kirkpatrick Meets Hess: Third Interview - Additional Conditions; Chapter Eight The Frustrations of the Deputy Führer; Chapter Nine The Hess Case Raised in the House of Commons

Chapter Ten Peace Proposal: Anglo-German Accord, 9 June 1941Chapter Eleven Peace Proposal: Alliance Against Bolshevism, 6 September 1941; Epilogue; Appendices; 1. Letter from Rudolf Hess to Adolf Hitler, 14 June 1941.; 2. Statement by Rudolf Hess on the Roosevelt-Churchill joint declaration of 12 August 1941.; 3. Letter from Rudolf Hess to the Duke of Hamilton, 19 May 1941.; 4. Peace Proposals by Rudolf Hess delivered personally to Lord Beaverbrook, 9 September 1941.; Sources; Index

At the height of the Second World War, Hitler's Deputy, Rudolf Hess, made a dramatic solo flight to the British Isles. His arrival there was sensational news - and it baffled everyone. Why had he come? Hess claimed he had flown to Britain entirely of his own initiative and was on a personal mission of peace. But so unlikely was the success of such an appeal in Churchill's entrenched Britain that historians continue to wonder at his motives. In this book, Peter Raina publishes, for the first time, complete texts of Hess's 'peace proposals' and a treatise he wrote in captivity outlining how he saw Nazi Germany's role in Europe. These texts throw considerable light on Hess's mission and also on how the Nazi leadership saw their programme of expansion and their relations with Britain. Disconcertingly single-minded and an unashamed disciple of Hitler, Hess was at heart an idealist. His friend and confidant Albrecht Haushofer was an idealist of a different kind, and joined the German Resistance Movement. The frame story of this book relates how the two men moved to their tragic ends.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Peter Raina has been a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research, School of Advanced Study, University of London, and an Associate Member of Nuffield College, Oxford. He is presently Senior Research Associate at the Graduate Centre of Balliol College, Oxford.

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