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Suppressed Terror : History and Perception of Soviet Special Camps in Germany

By: Greiner, Bettina.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lanham : Lexington Books, 2014Description: 1 online resource (419 p.).ISBN: 9780739177440.Subject(s): Collective memory -- Germany | Concentration camps -- Germany (East) -- History | Detention of persons -- Germany (East) -- History | Germany (East) -- Politics and government | Political persecution -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Political persecution -- Germany (East) -- History | Political violence -- Germany (East) -- History | State-sponsored terrorism -- Germany (East) -- History | State-sponsored terrorism -- Soviet Union -- History | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, SovietGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Suppressed Terror : History and Perception of Soviet Special Camps in GermanyDDC classification: 365.450943109044 | 365/.450943109044 LOC classification: JC599.G3 G74413 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION; INTRODUCTION; DETENTION MEASURES; DETENTION EXPERIENCES; DETENTION MEMORIES; THE SPECIAL CAMPS AND THEIR PLACE IN HISTORY; ABBREVIATIONS; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX OF NAMES; SUBJECT INDEX; ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Summary: After World War II, 154,000 Germans were arrested by the Soviet secret police and held incommunicado in so-called special camps in the Soviet occupation zone. One third of the inmates did not survive captivity. Based on Russian and German sources, Displaced Terror: History and Perception of Soviet Special Camps in Germany offers a multi-layered account of this chapter of Stalinist persecution and mass violence, which has largely been suppressed to this day. The reasons for this gap in German memory culture are also addressed.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JC599.G3 G74413 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1684210 Available EBL1684210

CONTENTS; PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION; INTRODUCTION; DETENTION MEASURES; DETENTION EXPERIENCES; DETENTION MEMORIES; THE SPECIAL CAMPS AND THEIR PLACE IN HISTORY; ABBREVIATIONS; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX OF NAMES; SUBJECT INDEX; ABOUT THE AUTHOR

After World War II, 154,000 Germans were arrested by the Soviet secret police and held incommunicado in so-called special camps in the Soviet occupation zone. One third of the inmates did not survive captivity. Based on Russian and German sources, Displaced Terror: History and Perception of Soviet Special Camps in Germany offers a multi-layered account of this chapter of Stalinist persecution and mass violence, which has largely been suppressed to this day. The reasons for this gap in German memory culture are also addressed.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

This translation of a 2010 German book is a deeply sourced, sophisticated analytical study of the imprisonment of German civilians in the Soviet military occupation zone in East Germany and the German Democratic Republic between 1945 and 1950. POWs and war criminals convicted by Soviet military courts were forced to work. But over 120,000 German civilians, arrested ostensibly for denazification procedures and kept in "special" camps, were not permitted to work. Two-thirds were never investigated for Nazi activity and not "re-educated." Inmates were isolated in reactivated Nazi concentration camps such as Sachsenhausen and Bautzen. Except for privileged "functionary" inmates (informers), they were fed near-starvation diets, confined to barracks, and brutally mistreated. One third of them died. What purpose did these special camps serve? Greiner (Hamburg Institute for Social Research, Germany) thinks they began as pretrial sites for suspected Nazis of minor standing and evolved into long-term prisons for unconvicted inmates. Soviet jurisprudence considered them guilty because they had been arrested. Inmates became hostages whose status warned against anti-Soviet behavior and served as occasional Cold War bargaining chips. Greiner reflects on changes in the historical memorialization of political captivity in Germany and warns against equating Nazi and Soviet political confinement, especially with regard to guilt and victimhood. --Gerald H. Davis, Georgia State University

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