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Domestic Violence Case Processing : A Serious Crime or a Waste of Precious Time?

By: Currul-Dykeman, Kathleen Erin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Law and Society: Publisher: El Paso : LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC, 2014Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (224 p.).ISBN: 9781593327668.Subject(s): Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Domestic violence | Family violence -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Domestic Violence Case Processing : A Serious Crime or a Waste of Precious Time?DDC classification: 344.730328292 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Laws governing the criminal justice system's response to domestic violence have changed through the passage of mandated arrest and prosecution policies. However, while arrest rates for domestic violence increased throughout the 1990s and 2000s, these cases continue to receive lenient treatment by our courts. Most are resolved with dismissals. Currel-Dykeman explores if the court community literature can offer a possible explanation to this problem. She analyzes the local legal culture of two courts, a traditional court and a specialized problem solving court to understand how they discuss and process domestic violence cases differently. Court workgroup members were interviewed and candidly spoke about these cases in a way that helped explain the problem.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF9322 .C87 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1690606 Available EBL1690606

Laws governing the criminal justice system's response to domestic violence have changed through the passage of mandated arrest and prosecution policies. However, while arrest rates for domestic violence increased throughout the 1990s and 2000s, these cases continue to receive lenient treatment by our courts. Most are resolved with dismissals. Currel-Dykeman explores if the court community literature can offer a possible explanation to this problem. She analyzes the local legal culture of two courts, a traditional court and a specialized problem solving court to understand how they discuss and process domestic violence cases differently. Court workgroup members were interviewed and candidly spoke about these cases in a way that helped explain the problem.

Description based upon print version of record.

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