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Corporate dreams : big business in American democracy from the Great Depression to the great recession / James Hoopes.

By: Hoopes, James, 1944-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2011Description: 1 online resource (ix, 234 p.) : ill.ISBN: 9780813552040 (electronic bk.); 0813552044 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Corporate culture -- United States -- History | Business and politics -- United States -- Case studies | Political ethics -- United States | Leadership -- United States -- History | United States -- Politics and government -- 2001-2009 | United States -- Moral conditionsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Corporate dreams.DDC classification: 338.0973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The corporate American dream at its height and in its origins -- The corporate American dream -- Corporate and national character -- From public purpose to private profit -- Corporations as enemies of the free market -- Corporate failure and government fix -- Corporate crashes -- Managers versus markets -- Corporations blow their chance to end the depression -- Roosevelt's confused anti-corporatism -- The corporation strikes back -- The right to manage -- Corporations recover their moral authority -- Killing the unions softly -- Creating Reagan and his voters -- What manner of man(ager)? -- Masking the arrogance of power -- Responsibility versus profit at general motors -- Critics of managerial character -- JFK's pyrrhic victory over U.S. steel -- The corporation in the wilderness again -- McNamara and the staffers -- The false confidence of the anti-corporatists -- Corporate America loses world supremacy -- Laying the groundwork for the corporation's cultural comeback -- Leadership -- Managing by values -- Creating the concept of corporate culture -- Inventing the leadership development industry -- Reagan aids corporations by bashing government -- Entrepreneurship -- Supply siders versus the big corporation -- Reengineering the corporation -- George W. Bush, Enron, and the great recession -- Can the corporate American dream be saved?
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD58.7 .H646 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5hjgkf Available ocn785785244

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The corporate American dream at its height and in its origins -- The corporate American dream -- Corporate and national character -- From public purpose to private profit -- Corporations as enemies of the free market -- Corporate failure and government fix -- Corporate crashes -- Managers versus markets -- Corporations blow their chance to end the depression -- Roosevelt's confused anti-corporatism -- The corporation strikes back -- The right to manage -- Corporations recover their moral authority -- Killing the unions softly -- Creating Reagan and his voters -- What manner of man(ager)? -- Masking the arrogance of power -- Responsibility versus profit at general motors -- Critics of managerial character -- JFK's pyrrhic victory over U.S. steel -- The corporation in the wilderness again -- McNamara and the staffers -- The false confidence of the anti-corporatists -- Corporate America loses world supremacy -- Laying the groundwork for the corporation's cultural comeback -- Leadership -- Managing by values -- Creating the concept of corporate culture -- Inventing the leadership development industry -- Reagan aids corporations by bashing government -- Entrepreneurship -- Supply siders versus the big corporation -- Reengineering the corporation -- George W. Bush, Enron, and the great recession -- Can the corporate American dream be saved?

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Hoopes (business ethics, Babson Coll.; Hail to the CEO: George W. Bush and the Failure of Moral Leadership) throws his hat into the crowded ring of books on the evils of corporate America. Others include Ted Nace's Gangs of America: The Rise of Corporate Power and the Disabling of Democracy, William D. Cohan's Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came To Rule the World, and Jeff Madrick's Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970 to the -Present. Hoopes seeks to resurrect in Americans a "moderate anticorporatism" by tracing the history of corporate culture from the 1930s to the end of George W. Bush's presidency. He divides the book into seven parts that correspond to stages in the evolutionary time line of corporate culture, each of which includes four vignettes that describe a defining event or important personality that significantly impacted the stage. VERDICT A quick read with academic flavor, this title will appeal to fans of political and business history as well as those looking to better understand what led to America's latest recession.-Sara Holder, McGill Univ. Lib., Montreal (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Throughout American history, there has been an intriguing tension between corporate authoritarian rule and the democratic ideals of the government. Hoopes (business ethics, Babson College) argues in this timely volume that despite prevailing anticorporatism, Americans have been in awe of corporations and have placed too much faith in their leadership. He examines the ebb and flow of illusions surrounding business management from the Great Depression to the great recession (and periodic anticorporate reactions, usually stemming from scandal), and seeks to reveal that the corporation is a moral paradox that improves prosperity by subjecting its workforce to overbearing authority. Hoopes's examination of seminal writings (e.g., C. Wright Mills, The White Collar) and business leaders (e.g., GM's Charles Wilson, Ford's Robert McNamara) shows how they significantly shaped public views. More recently the allure of entrepreneurship and small businesses generated during the technology boom has spawned a new anticorporate mentality, even though many corporations (IBM is noted) have become increasingly entrepreneurial. Hoopes argues that Americans must understand the usefulness of corporations while being wary of their power, and must maintain discerning suspicion of corporate power as they have been mindful of politicians. Excellent chapter on critics of managerial character. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers; students, upper-division undergraduate and up; faculty; professionals. R. M. Hyser James Madison University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>JAMES HOOPES is Murata Professor of Business Ethics at Babson College. He has written several books, on subjects ranging from business history to American political theory, including Hail to the CEO: George W. Bush and the Failure of Moral Leadership .</p>

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