Look Back in Gender (Routledge Revivals) : Sexuality and the Family in Post-War British Drama

By: Wandor, MicheleneMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Routledge Revivals: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (192 p.)ISBN: 9781317606154Subject(s): Domestic drama, English -- History and criticism | English drama -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Families in literature | Feminism and literature -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Feminist drama, English -- History and criticism | Literature and society -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century | Sex role in literature | World War, 1939-1945 -- Great Britain -- InfluenceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Look Back in Gender (Routledge Revivals) : Sexuality and the Family in Post-War British DramaDDC classification: 822.91409353 | 822/.914/09353 LOC classification: PR739.S45 W3 2014Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Introduction Imagine . . . The imperative of gender; PART ONE; After the War was Over . . .; Heroism, Crises of Manhood and the Kitchen Sink: Look Back in Anger and A Patriot For Me; The Jewish Family, Women and Politics: The Wesker Trilogy; The State, Communication and Gender: Waiting for Godot and The Room and The Birthday Party; Militarism and the Outside World: Serjeant Musgrave's Dance; Motherhood and Masculinity: A Taste of Honey and The Sport of My Mad Mother and The Knack
Women and Emancipation: Each His (sic) Own Wilderness and Play with a TigerAnarchy, the Family and Taboo Sexuality: Entertaining Mr Sloane and Loot; Urban Violence: Saved; Homosexuality: Metaphor and Theme: The Killing of Sister George and Staircase; The Story So Far: Part One; INTERVAL; The Royal Smut-Hound; PART TWO; The Changing Landscape: The End of Censorship, New Politics and Imaginations; Mother on a Pedestal, a Doubtful Chivalry: The Mother; Transitional Pioneers: Vagina Rex and the Gas Oven and Rites; Sex, Violence and the Psyche: AC/DC, Lay-By and Occupations
Satire, Creativity and Annihilation: Slag and Teeth ''n'' SmilesThe Taboo as Metaphor: The Romans in Britian; Existential Women: Owners and Top Girls; The British Left: Destiny and Maydays; Institutional Power and Male Sexuality: Operation Bad Apple, Tibetan Inroads and Bent ; Woman as Subject: Once a Catholic, Piaf and Steaming; The Story So Far: Part Two; Conclusion; Select Bibliography of Plays; Index
Summary: In this challenging book, first published in 1987, Michelene Wandor looks at the best-known plays in the thirty years prior to publication, from Look Back in Anger onwards. Wandor investigates the representation of the family and different forms of sexuality in these plays and re-reviews them from a perspective that throws into sharp relief the function of gender as an important determinant of plot, setting and the portrayal of character. Juxtaposing the period before 1968, when statutory censorship was still in force, with the years following its abolition, Wandor scrutinises the key plays of, among others, Osborne, Pinter, Wesker, Arden, and Delaney. Each one is analysed in terms of its social context: the influence of World War II, the testing of gender roles, the development of the Welfare State and changes in family patterns, and the impact of feminist, Left-wing and gay politics. Throughout the period, two generations of playwrights and theatregoers transformed the theatre into a forum in which they could articulate and explore the interaction of their interpersonal relationships with the wider political sphere. These changes are explored in this title, which will allow readers to re-evaluate their view of post-war British drama.
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PR739.S45 W3 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1734131 Available EBL1734131

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Introduction Imagine . . . The imperative of gender; PART ONE; After the War was Over . . .; Heroism, Crises of Manhood and the Kitchen Sink: Look Back in Anger and A Patriot For Me; The Jewish Family, Women and Politics: The Wesker Trilogy; The State, Communication and Gender: Waiting for Godot and The Room and The Birthday Party; Militarism and the Outside World: Serjeant Musgrave's Dance; Motherhood and Masculinity: A Taste of Honey and The Sport of My Mad Mother and The Knack

Women and Emancipation: Each His (sic) Own Wilderness and Play with a TigerAnarchy, the Family and Taboo Sexuality: Entertaining Mr Sloane and Loot; Urban Violence: Saved; Homosexuality: Metaphor and Theme: The Killing of Sister George and Staircase; The Story So Far: Part One; INTERVAL; The Royal Smut-Hound; PART TWO; The Changing Landscape: The End of Censorship, New Politics and Imaginations; Mother on a Pedestal, a Doubtful Chivalry: The Mother; Transitional Pioneers: Vagina Rex and the Gas Oven and Rites; Sex, Violence and the Psyche: AC/DC, Lay-By and Occupations

Satire, Creativity and Annihilation: Slag and Teeth ''n'' SmilesThe Taboo as Metaphor: The Romans in Britian; Existential Women: Owners and Top Girls; The British Left: Destiny and Maydays; Institutional Power and Male Sexuality: Operation Bad Apple, Tibetan Inroads and Bent ; Woman as Subject: Once a Catholic, Piaf and Steaming; The Story So Far: Part Two; Conclusion; Select Bibliography of Plays; Index

In this challenging book, first published in 1987, Michelene Wandor looks at the best-known plays in the thirty years prior to publication, from Look Back in Anger onwards. Wandor investigates the representation of the family and different forms of sexuality in these plays and re-reviews them from a perspective that throws into sharp relief the function of gender as an important determinant of plot, setting and the portrayal of character. Juxtaposing the period before 1968, when statutory censorship was still in force, with the years following its abolition, Wandor scrutinises the key plays of, among others, Osborne, Pinter, Wesker, Arden, and Delaney. Each one is analysed in terms of its social context: the influence of World War II, the testing of gender roles, the development of the Welfare State and changes in family patterns, and the impact of feminist, Left-wing and gay politics. Throughout the period, two generations of playwrights and theatregoers transformed the theatre into a forum in which they could articulate and explore the interaction of their interpersonal relationships with the wider political sphere. These changes are explored in this title, which will allow readers to re-evaluate their view of post-war British drama.

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