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Women and the Family : Two Decades of Change

By: Hess, Beth.
Contributor(s): Sussman, Marvin B.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (265 p.).ISBN: 9781317954002.Subject(s): Families -- United States | Feminism -- United States | United States -- Social conditions -- 1960- | Women -- United States -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women and the Family : Two Decades of ChangeDDC classification: 305.4/2/0973 | 305.420973 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Chapter 1: Women''s Roles in Mythic Tradition and a Planetary Culture; Chapter 2: The Women''s Movement and the Family: A Socio-Historical Analysis of Constraints on Social Change; Historical Perspective on the Movements; The Complexity of the Relationship Between the Family, Society, and Women''s Status; Practical Problems of Achieving Equality in the Family as Opposed to Achieving Equality in the Larger Society; Motherhood; The Women''s Movement and the Family of the Future
Chapter 3: In Defense of Traditional Values: The Anti-Feminist MovementChapter 4: Women''s Work in the Home: Seems Like Old Times; Research Methods and Characteristics of the Sample; Household Labor; Time; Task Duration; Division of Labor; Working Conditions; Feelings About Household Work; Discussion and Conclusion; Chapter 5: The View from Below: Women''s Employment and Gender Equality in Working Class Families; Work and Family: Women''s Double Bind; Work, Family, and Class; Methodology; Women''s Employment as Contribution or Cost; The Invisibility of Housework; Housework and Power
Conclusions and Further DirectionsChapter 6: Working Wives and Mothers; Trends in Labor Force Participation: 1950 to 1980; Wives Without Children; Mothers with Children Under Age 18; Consequences of Employment Among Families with Children; Effects on Marriage; Women with Children Age 18 or Older; Conclusions and Prospects for the Future; Chapter 7: Dual-Earner Families; Predicting the Consequences of Women''s Employment; Harmful Effects: Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives; Structural Effects: Theoretical Perspectives; Descriptive Studies of Dual-Earner Families
Costs and Benefits in Dual-Earner Families: Last RemarksChapter 8: Afro-American Women and Their Families; Historical Context; A Stereotype in Children''s Toys; Sociodemographic Variables; Social Class Determinants of Family Organization; The Struggling Poor; Working Class Families; The Middle Class; The Upper Class; Summary; Chapter 9: Men in Families; Overview; The Social Context of Gender Roles; Constancy and Change in Gender Role Attitudes; Constancy and Change in Gender Role Behavior; Men''s Family Roles; Time Spent in Family Roles; Men''s Roles in Dual-Earner and Dual-Career Families
Men''s Family Roles and Social ClassWhy Don''t Men Do More?; Men''s Satisfaction with Family Roles; Men and Fathering; Social Forces Impeding and Supporting Change; Supporting Men''s Involvement with Their Families; Chapter 10: Changing Family Roles and Interactions; Models of Family Change; Changing Family Roles: An Assessment of the Provider Role and Attitudes Toward Women''s Labor Force Participation; The Homemaker and Childcare Roles: Attitudes and Responsibilities; Time Use and Work Loads: Issues of Equality; Marital Power Relations; Sexual Relations; Facts and Theories: An Evaluation
Exchange Theory
Summary: Despite the pervasive changes that have taken place in women's lives in the past twenty-five years--increased participation in the labor force, the attainment of higher levels of education, and higher salaries--comparable changes in the division of family labor and in the roles of men have lagged considerably. In this timely book, the editors and other experts in feminism and family studies examine the effects of two decades of influence by the women's movement on sex roles and child rearing. While applauding some positive changes, the contributors point to powerful forces of resistance to equality between the sexes, especially "the question of family"--the fear of depriving children of maternal attachment and the belief that working mothers are placing their own interests above those of other family members--as an issue that, until fully addressed, prevents genuine equality between the sexes.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1426 .W636 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1713437 Available EBL1713437

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Chapter 1: Women''s Roles in Mythic Tradition and a Planetary Culture; Chapter 2: The Women''s Movement and the Family: A Socio-Historical Analysis of Constraints on Social Change; Historical Perspective on the Movements; The Complexity of the Relationship Between the Family, Society, and Women''s Status; Practical Problems of Achieving Equality in the Family as Opposed to Achieving Equality in the Larger Society; Motherhood; The Women''s Movement and the Family of the Future

Chapter 3: In Defense of Traditional Values: The Anti-Feminist MovementChapter 4: Women''s Work in the Home: Seems Like Old Times; Research Methods and Characteristics of the Sample; Household Labor; Time; Task Duration; Division of Labor; Working Conditions; Feelings About Household Work; Discussion and Conclusion; Chapter 5: The View from Below: Women''s Employment and Gender Equality in Working Class Families; Work and Family: Women''s Double Bind; Work, Family, and Class; Methodology; Women''s Employment as Contribution or Cost; The Invisibility of Housework; Housework and Power

Conclusions and Further DirectionsChapter 6: Working Wives and Mothers; Trends in Labor Force Participation: 1950 to 1980; Wives Without Children; Mothers with Children Under Age 18; Consequences of Employment Among Families with Children; Effects on Marriage; Women with Children Age 18 or Older; Conclusions and Prospects for the Future; Chapter 7: Dual-Earner Families; Predicting the Consequences of Women''s Employment; Harmful Effects: Theoretical and Methodological Perspectives; Structural Effects: Theoretical Perspectives; Descriptive Studies of Dual-Earner Families

Costs and Benefits in Dual-Earner Families: Last RemarksChapter 8: Afro-American Women and Their Families; Historical Context; A Stereotype in Children''s Toys; Sociodemographic Variables; Social Class Determinants of Family Organization; The Struggling Poor; Working Class Families; The Middle Class; The Upper Class; Summary; Chapter 9: Men in Families; Overview; The Social Context of Gender Roles; Constancy and Change in Gender Role Attitudes; Constancy and Change in Gender Role Behavior; Men''s Family Roles; Time Spent in Family Roles; Men''s Roles in Dual-Earner and Dual-Career Families

Men''s Family Roles and Social ClassWhy Don''t Men Do More?; Men''s Satisfaction with Family Roles; Men and Fathering; Social Forces Impeding and Supporting Change; Supporting Men''s Involvement with Their Families; Chapter 10: Changing Family Roles and Interactions; Models of Family Change; Changing Family Roles: An Assessment of the Provider Role and Attitudes Toward Women''s Labor Force Participation; The Homemaker and Childcare Roles: Attitudes and Responsibilities; Time Use and Work Loads: Issues of Equality; Marital Power Relations; Sexual Relations; Facts and Theories: An Evaluation

Exchange Theory

Despite the pervasive changes that have taken place in women's lives in the past twenty-five years--increased participation in the labor force, the attainment of higher levels of education, and higher salaries--comparable changes in the division of family labor and in the roles of men have lagged considerably. In this timely book, the editors and other experts in feminism and family studies examine the effects of two decades of influence by the women's movement on sex roles and child rearing. While applauding some positive changes, the contributors point to powerful forces of resistance to equality between the sexes, especially "the question of family"--the fear of depriving children of maternal attachment and the belief that working mothers are placing their own interests above those of other family members--as an issue that, until fully addressed, prevents genuine equality between the sexes.

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