The Subject of Tragedy (Routledge Revivals) : Identity and Difference in Renaissance Drama

By: Belsey, CatherineMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Routledge Revivals: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (350 p.)ISBN: 9781317744443Subject(s): Difference (Psychology) in literature | Drama -- Psychological aspects | English drama -- 17th century -- History and criticism | English drama -- Early modern and Elizabethan, 1500-1600 -- History and criticism | English drama (Tragedy) -- History and criticism | Identity (Psychology) in literature | Renaissance -- England | Sex role in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Subject of Tragedy (Routledge Revivals) : Identity and Difference in Renaissance DramaDDC classification: 822.009355 | 822/.009/355 LOC classification: PR658.S42 B45 2014Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Preface; 1. Introduction: reading the past; Part I: Man; 2. Unity; 2.1 Discontinuity; 2.2 The spectator; 2.3 Interiority; 2.4 The soliloquy; 3. Knowledge; 3.1 Discursive knowledge; 3.2 Empirical knowledge; 3.3 Knowledge in conflict; 3.4 The triumph of empiricism; 3.5 The production of knowledge; 4. Autonomy; 4.1 Tyranny; 4.2 The limits of sovereignty; 4.3 The sovereign subject; Part II: Woman; 5. Alice Arden's crime; 5.1 Defining the crime; 5.2 Murderous women
5.3 The control of marriage5.4 The new family; 6. Silence and speech; 6.1 An uncertain place; 6.2 Discursive discontinuity; 6.3 A question of patience; 6.4 The demonization of eloquence; 7. Finding a place; 7.1 Women as subjects; 7.2 Advice and consent; 7.3 Love and marriage; 7.4 Women's speaking justified; 8. Conclusion: changing the present; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: First published in 1985, The Subject of Tragedy takes the drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as the starting point for an analysis of the differential identities of man and woman. Catherine Belsey charts, in a range of fictional and non-fictional texts, the production in the Renaissance of a meaning for subjectivity that is identifiably modern. The subject of liberal humanism - self-determining, free origin of language, choice and action - is highlighted as the product of a specific period in which man was the subject to which woman was related.
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PR658.S42 B45 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1713463 Available EBL1713463

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Preface; 1. Introduction: reading the past; Part I: Man; 2. Unity; 2.1 Discontinuity; 2.2 The spectator; 2.3 Interiority; 2.4 The soliloquy; 3. Knowledge; 3.1 Discursive knowledge; 3.2 Empirical knowledge; 3.3 Knowledge in conflict; 3.4 The triumph of empiricism; 3.5 The production of knowledge; 4. Autonomy; 4.1 Tyranny; 4.2 The limits of sovereignty; 4.3 The sovereign subject; Part II: Woman; 5. Alice Arden's crime; 5.1 Defining the crime; 5.2 Murderous women

5.3 The control of marriage5.4 The new family; 6. Silence and speech; 6.1 An uncertain place; 6.2 Discursive discontinuity; 6.3 A question of patience; 6.4 The demonization of eloquence; 7. Finding a place; 7.1 Women as subjects; 7.2 Advice and consent; 7.3 Love and marriage; 7.4 Women's speaking justified; 8. Conclusion: changing the present; Notes; Bibliography; Index

First published in 1985, The Subject of Tragedy takes the drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as the starting point for an analysis of the differential identities of man and woman. Catherine Belsey charts, in a range of fictional and non-fictional texts, the production in the Renaissance of a meaning for subjectivity that is identifiably modern. The subject of liberal humanism - self-determining, free origin of language, choice and action - is highlighted as the product of a specific period in which man was the subject to which woman was related.

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