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Mac OS X for Unix Geeks (Leopard).

By: Rothman, Ernest E.
Contributor(s): Jepson, Brian | Rosen, Rich.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Sebastopol : O'Reilly Media, 2008Edition: 4.Description: 1 online resource (432 p.).ISBN: 9780596555191.Subject(s): Mac OS | Macintosh (Computer) --Programming | Operating systems (Computers) | UNIX (Computer file)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Mac OS X for Unix Geeks (Leopard)DDC classification: 005.4/4682 | 005.4465 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Mac OS X for Unix Geeks; Organization of This Book; Part II, Building Applications; Part III, Working with Packages; Part IV, Serving and System Management; Appendix; Xcode Tools; Where to Go for More Information; Conventions Used in This Book; Comments and Questions; Safari® Books Online; Acknowledgments from the Previous Editions; Acknowledgments from Brian Jepson; Acknowledgments from Ernest E. Rothman; Acknowledgments from Rich Rosen; I. Getting Around; The Terminal and xterm Compared; Using the Terminal; The Contextual Menu; Customizing the Terminal; Settings; Window groups
Customizing the Terminal on the FlyExporting and Importing Terminal Settings; Saving Terminal settings in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard; Working with File and Directory Names; Changing Your Shell; The Services Menu; Bonjour; Alternative Terminal Applications; The open Command; 2. Searching and Metadata; Inspecting a File's Attributes; Managing Spotlight; Apple's Hiding Places for File Metadata; Preserving Metadata; 3. Files and Filesystems; Troubleshooting; Files and Directories; The /etc Directory; The /dev Directory; The /var Directory; The /System/Library Directory; The /Library Directory
4. StartupInitialization; launchd; SystemStarter; Mach Bootstrap Services; Creating Programs that Run Automatically; SystemStarter; The property list; Launching with launchd; Periodic Jobs; 5. Directory Services; Configuring Directory Services; Managing Directory Services Data; Creating a user's home directory; Granting administrative privileges; Modifying a user; Deleting a user; Managing Groups; Adding users to a group; Deleting a group; Managing Hostnames and IP Addresses; Flat Files and Their Directory Services Counterparts; Programming with Directory Services; 6. Printing
Creating a Desktop Icon for a PrinterModifying a Printer's Settings; Monitoring Printer Status and Troubleshooting; Printer Sharing; The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS); KDE; Manual printer configuration (Linux and Unix); Printing from Linux; Printing-Related Shell Commands; Open Source Printer Drivers; The HP InkJet Server (HPIJS) Project; 7. The X Window System and VNC; Running X11; Customizing X11; X11 Preferences, Applications Menu, and Dock Menu; Output; Security; Customizing X11's Applications menu; X11-Based Applications and Libraries; TKAqua; Connecting to Other X Window Systems
Virtual Network Computing (VNC)Connecting to the Mac OS X VNC Server; Aqua-based VNC servers; Screen Sharing with iChat; Restarting VNC Connections; 8. Third-Party Tools and Applications; Fugu; SSH Agent; Mounting SSH Servers As Network Volumes; TeX; TeXShop; LaTeXiT; R with an Aqua GUI; Open Source Replacements for Microsoft Office; Video; Image Editing; 3D Modeling; 9. Dual-Boot and Beyond; Linux on Mac Hardware; Installation and Configuration; Linux on Older Macs; Mac-on-Linux; Emulators on Mac OS X; Parallels; VMware Fusion; Virtual PC; VirtualBox; QEMU; II. Building Applications
Compiling Unix Source Code
Summary: If you're a developer or system administrator lured to Mac OS X because of its Unix roots, you'll quickly discover that performing Unix tasks on a Mac is different than what you're accustomed to. Mac OS X for Unix Geeks serves as a bridge between Apple's Darwin OS and the more traditional Unix systems. This clear, concise guide gives you a tour of Mac OS X's Unix shell in both Leopard and Tiger, and helps you find the facilities that replace or correspond to standard Unix utilities. You'll learn how to perform common Unix tasks in Mac OS X, such as using Directory Services instead of the standard Unix /etc/passwd and /etc/group, and you'll be able to compile code, link to libraries, and port Unix software using either Leopard and Tiger. This book teaches you to: Navigate the Terminal and understand how it differs from an xtermUse Open Directory (LDAP) and NetInfo as well as Directory ServicesCompile your code with GCC 4Port Unix programs to Mac OS X with FinkUse MacPorts to install free/open source softwareSearch through metadata with Spotlight's command-line utilitiesBuild the Darwin kernel And there's much more. Mac OS X for Unix Geeks is the ideal survival guide to tame the Unix side of Leopard and Tiger. If you're a Unix geek with an interest in Mac OS X, you'll soon find that this book is invaluable.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.76.O63J475 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=443108 Available EBL443108

Mac OS X for Unix Geeks; Organization of This Book; Part II, Building Applications; Part III, Working with Packages; Part IV, Serving and System Management; Appendix; Xcode Tools; Where to Go for More Information; Conventions Used in This Book; Comments and Questions; Safari® Books Online; Acknowledgments from the Previous Editions; Acknowledgments from Brian Jepson; Acknowledgments from Ernest E. Rothman; Acknowledgments from Rich Rosen; I. Getting Around; The Terminal and xterm Compared; Using the Terminal; The Contextual Menu; Customizing the Terminal; Settings; Window groups

Customizing the Terminal on the FlyExporting and Importing Terminal Settings; Saving Terminal settings in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard; Working with File and Directory Names; Changing Your Shell; The Services Menu; Bonjour; Alternative Terminal Applications; The open Command; 2. Searching and Metadata; Inspecting a File's Attributes; Managing Spotlight; Apple's Hiding Places for File Metadata; Preserving Metadata; 3. Files and Filesystems; Troubleshooting; Files and Directories; The /etc Directory; The /dev Directory; The /var Directory; The /System/Library Directory; The /Library Directory

4. StartupInitialization; launchd; SystemStarter; Mach Bootstrap Services; Creating Programs that Run Automatically; SystemStarter; The property list; Launching with launchd; Periodic Jobs; 5. Directory Services; Configuring Directory Services; Managing Directory Services Data; Creating a user's home directory; Granting administrative privileges; Modifying a user; Deleting a user; Managing Groups; Adding users to a group; Deleting a group; Managing Hostnames and IP Addresses; Flat Files and Their Directory Services Counterparts; Programming with Directory Services; 6. Printing

Creating a Desktop Icon for a PrinterModifying a Printer's Settings; Monitoring Printer Status and Troubleshooting; Printer Sharing; The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS); KDE; Manual printer configuration (Linux and Unix); Printing from Linux; Printing-Related Shell Commands; Open Source Printer Drivers; The HP InkJet Server (HPIJS) Project; 7. The X Window System and VNC; Running X11; Customizing X11; X11 Preferences, Applications Menu, and Dock Menu; Output; Security; Customizing X11's Applications menu; X11-Based Applications and Libraries; TKAqua; Connecting to Other X Window Systems

Virtual Network Computing (VNC)Connecting to the Mac OS X VNC Server; Aqua-based VNC servers; Screen Sharing with iChat; Restarting VNC Connections; 8. Third-Party Tools and Applications; Fugu; SSH Agent; Mounting SSH Servers As Network Volumes; TeX; TeXShop; LaTeXiT; R with an Aqua GUI; Open Source Replacements for Microsoft Office; Video; Image Editing; 3D Modeling; 9. Dual-Boot and Beyond; Linux on Mac Hardware; Installation and Configuration; Linux on Older Macs; Mac-on-Linux; Emulators on Mac OS X; Parallels; VMware Fusion; Virtual PC; VirtualBox; QEMU; II. Building Applications

Compiling Unix Source Code

If you're a developer or system administrator lured to Mac OS X because of its Unix roots, you'll quickly discover that performing Unix tasks on a Mac is different than what you're accustomed to. Mac OS X for Unix Geeks serves as a bridge between Apple's Darwin OS and the more traditional Unix systems. This clear, concise guide gives you a tour of Mac OS X's Unix shell in both Leopard and Tiger, and helps you find the facilities that replace or correspond to standard Unix utilities. You'll learn how to perform common Unix tasks in Mac OS X, such as using Directory Services instead of the standard Unix /etc/passwd and /etc/group, and you'll be able to compile code, link to libraries, and port Unix software using either Leopard and Tiger. This book teaches you to: Navigate the Terminal and understand how it differs from an xtermUse Open Directory (LDAP) and NetInfo as well as Directory ServicesCompile your code with GCC 4Port Unix programs to Mac OS X with FinkUse MacPorts to install free/open source softwareSearch through metadata with Spotlight's command-line utilitiesBuild the Darwin kernel And there's much more. Mac OS X for Unix Geeks is the ideal survival guide to tame the Unix side of Leopard and Tiger. If you're a Unix geek with an interest in Mac OS X, you'll soon find that this book is invaluable.

Description based upon print version of record.

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