A Voice That Could Stir an Army : Fannie Lou Hamer and the Rhetoric of the Black Freedom Movement

By: Brooks, Maegan ParkerMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2014Description: 1 online resource (323 p.)ISBN: 9781628460056Subject(s): African American women civil rights workers -- Biography | African American women civil rights workers -- Mississippi -- Biography | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- Mississippi -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights workers -- Mississippi -- Biography | Civil rights workers -- United States -- Biography | Hamer, Fannie LouGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Voice That Could Stir an Army : Fannie Lou Hamer and the Rhetoric of the Black Freedom MovementDDC classification: 323.092 LOC classification: E185.97 .H35 B76 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction: "I Don't Mind My Light Shining"; Chapter 1 A Rhetorical Education, 1917-1962; Chapter 2 Through the Shadows of Death, 1962-1964; Chapter 3 "Is This America?," 1964; Chapter 4 "The Country's Number One Freedom Fighting Woman," 1964-1968; Chapter 5 "To Tell It Like It Is," 1968-1972; Chapter 6 The Problems and the Progress; Afterword: "We Ain't Free Yet. The Kids Need to Know Their Mission," 2012; Acknowledgments; Coda: Listen to the "Voice That Could Stir an Army"; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S
TU; V; W; Y
Summary: A sharecropper, a warrior, and a truth-telling prophet, Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977) stands as a powerful symbol not only of the 1960s black freedom movement, but also of the enduring human struggle against oppression. A Voice That Could Stir an Army is a rhetorical biography that tells the story of Hamer's life by focusing on how she employed symbols-- images, words, and even material objects such as the ballot, food, and clothing--to construct persuasive public personae, to influence audiences, and to effect social change. Drawing upon dozens of newly recovered Hamer texts and recent interviews with Hamer's friends, family, and fellow activists, Maegan Parker Brooks moves chronologically through Hamer's life. Brooks recounts Hamer's early influences, her intersection with the black freedom movement, and her rise to prominence at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Brooks also considers Hamer's lesser-known contributions to the fight against poverty and to feminist politics before analyzing how Hamer is remembered posthumously. The book concludes by emphasizing what remains rhetorical about Hamer's biography, using the 2012 statue and museum dedication in Hamer's hometown of Ruleville, Mississippi, to examine the larger social, political, and historiographical implications of her legacy. The sustained consideration of Hamer's wide-ranging use of symbols and the reconstruction of her legacy provided within the pages of A Voice That Could Stir an Army enrich understanding of this key historical figure. This book also demonstrates how rhetorical analysis complements historical reconstruction to explain the dynamics of how social movements actually operate.
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Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction: "I Don't Mind My Light Shining"; Chapter 1 A Rhetorical Education, 1917-1962; Chapter 2 Through the Shadows of Death, 1962-1964; Chapter 3 "Is This America?," 1964; Chapter 4 "The Country's Number One Freedom Fighting Woman," 1964-1968; Chapter 5 "To Tell It Like It Is," 1968-1972; Chapter 6 The Problems and the Progress; Afterword: "We Ain't Free Yet. The Kids Need to Know Their Mission," 2012; Acknowledgments; Coda: Listen to the "Voice That Could Stir an Army"; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S

TU; V; W; Y

A sharecropper, a warrior, and a truth-telling prophet, Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977) stands as a powerful symbol not only of the 1960s black freedom movement, but also of the enduring human struggle against oppression. A Voice That Could Stir an Army is a rhetorical biography that tells the story of Hamer's life by focusing on how she employed symbols-- images, words, and even material objects such as the ballot, food, and clothing--to construct persuasive public personae, to influence audiences, and to effect social change. Drawing upon dozens of newly recovered Hamer texts and recent interviews with Hamer's friends, family, and fellow activists, Maegan Parker Brooks moves chronologically through Hamer's life. Brooks recounts Hamer's early influences, her intersection with the black freedom movement, and her rise to prominence at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Brooks also considers Hamer's lesser-known contributions to the fight against poverty and to feminist politics before analyzing how Hamer is remembered posthumously. The book concludes by emphasizing what remains rhetorical about Hamer's biography, using the 2012 statue and museum dedication in Hamer's hometown of Ruleville, Mississippi, to examine the larger social, political, and historiographical implications of her legacy. The sustained consideration of Hamer's wide-ranging use of symbols and the reconstruction of her legacy provided within the pages of A Voice That Could Stir an Army enrich understanding of this key historical figure. This book also demonstrates how rhetorical analysis complements historical reconstruction to explain the dynamics of how social movements actually operate.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is the best book on the famous civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer and one of the better books on the civil rights movement in general. A scholar of rhetoric, Brooks focuses closely on the content and context of Hamer's public addresses, often employing the terminology of that discipline, which will particularly appeal to scholars in that field. Beyond that, however, Brooks and her collaborator, Davis Houck, who together coedited the 2011 compilation The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer, the single best primary source anthology available for studying the grassroots sharecropper activist turned warrior, provide a wealth of detailed local history and a close analysis of Hamer's life. This includes the most extensive and perceptive coverage available of her early years prior to joining the movement as well as the struggles, tragedies, and difficulties of Hamer's later years. In short, the work combines the best of archival research (and appropriate reference to the secondary historical literature on the freedom movement in Mississippi) and rhetorical analysis, ultimately successfully recovering "Hamer's symbolic legacy by recovering her agency and intellect" and demonstrating how her iconic status "worked toward and against her activist purposes." For all scholarly libraries. Summing Up: Essential. Most levels/libraries. --Paul Harvey, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Maegan Parker Brooks is a member of the National Fannie Lou Hamer Statue and Education Fund Committee. She is lead researcher on a documentary about Hamer; author of A Voice That Could Stir an Army: Fannie Lou Hamer and the Rhetoric of the Black Freedom Movement ; and coeditor, with Davis W. Houck, of The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer: To Tell It Like It Is , both published by University Press of Mississippi.

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