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The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South, 1918–1942.

By: Harold, Claudrena N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in African American History and Culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (327 p.).ISBN: 9781135913038.Subject(s): African Americans -- Biography | African Americans -- Race identity -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Southern States -- Politics and government -- 20th century | Black nationalism -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | City and town life -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 -- Political and social views | Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 | Southern States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | Southern States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Universal Negro Improvement AssociationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South, 1918–1942DDC classification: 305.896073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Garveyism and the Rise of New Negro Politics in the Jim Crow South; The Political Rise of Marcus Mosiah Garvey; The Birth of American Garveyism; Garveyism Penetrates the Jim Crow South; Opposition to the Southern Wing of the Unia; Conclusion; Chapter Two: "We Are Constantly on the Firing Line": The Garvey Movement in New Orleans, 1920-1935; The Founding of the New Orleans Unia; The Search for Economic Independece; The Social World of New Orleans Garveyism
A Movement in Crisis: New Orleans Garveyism, the 1922 Convention, and the Eason ControversyLocal Response to Eason's Death; The Revitalization of a Movement; New Orleans Garveyites and Community Activism, 1927-1930; The Opening of the Unia Free Community Medical Clinic; Educating the Masses; The Great Depression and the Decline of New Orleans Garveyism; Conclusion; Chapter Three: "I Am a Stranger Here": Bahamians and the Garvey Movement in Miami, Florida, 1920-1933; The Founding of the Miami Unia; The Expansion of Miami Garveyism; Miami Garveyites Struggle for Economic Independence
White Opposition to the UniaShifting Political Perspectives and the Question of African Repatriation, 1925-1930; The Great Depression and the Collapse of the Miami Unia; Conclusion; Figures; Chapter Four: Virginian Garveyism, 1918-1942; Hampton Roads, Virginia: The Birthplace of Southern Garveyism; Virginia Garveyism and the Postwar Recession; New Strategies: Garveyites, White Colonizationists, and the African Repatriation Movement; Conclusion; Chapter Five: Life after the Garvey Movement; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South provides the first detailed examination of the Universal Negro Improvement Association's rise, maturation, and eventual decline in the urban South between 1918 and 1942. It examines the ways in which Southern black workers fused locally-based traditions, ideologies, and strategies of resistance with the Pan-African agenda of the UNIA to create a dynamic and multifaceted movement. A testament to the multidimensionality of black political subjectivity, Southern Garveyites fashioned a politics reflective of their international, regional, and local attachments. Moving beyond the usual focus on New York and the charismatic personality of Marcus Garvey, this book situates black workers at the center of its analysis and aims to provide a much-needed grassroots perspective on the Garvey movement. More than simply providing a regional history of one of the most important Pan-African movements of the twentieth century, The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South demonstrates the ways in which racial, class, and spatial dynamics resulted in complex, and at times competing articulations of black nationalism.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.97.G3 H37 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1701969 Available EBL1701969

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Garveyism and the Rise of New Negro Politics in the Jim Crow South; The Political Rise of Marcus Mosiah Garvey; The Birth of American Garveyism; Garveyism Penetrates the Jim Crow South; Opposition to the Southern Wing of the Unia; Conclusion; Chapter Two: "We Are Constantly on the Firing Line": The Garvey Movement in New Orleans, 1920-1935; The Founding of the New Orleans Unia; The Search for Economic Independece; The Social World of New Orleans Garveyism

A Movement in Crisis: New Orleans Garveyism, the 1922 Convention, and the Eason ControversyLocal Response to Eason's Death; The Revitalization of a Movement; New Orleans Garveyites and Community Activism, 1927-1930; The Opening of the Unia Free Community Medical Clinic; Educating the Masses; The Great Depression and the Decline of New Orleans Garveyism; Conclusion; Chapter Three: "I Am a Stranger Here": Bahamians and the Garvey Movement in Miami, Florida, 1920-1933; The Founding of the Miami Unia; The Expansion of Miami Garveyism; Miami Garveyites Struggle for Economic Independence

White Opposition to the UniaShifting Political Perspectives and the Question of African Repatriation, 1925-1930; The Great Depression and the Collapse of the Miami Unia; Conclusion; Figures; Chapter Four: Virginian Garveyism, 1918-1942; Hampton Roads, Virginia: The Birthplace of Southern Garveyism; Virginia Garveyism and the Postwar Recession; New Strategies: Garveyites, White Colonizationists, and the African Repatriation Movement; Conclusion; Chapter Five: Life after the Garvey Movement; Notes; Bibliography; Index

The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South provides the first detailed examination of the Universal Negro Improvement Association's rise, maturation, and eventual decline in the urban South between 1918 and 1942. It examines the ways in which Southern black workers fused locally-based traditions, ideologies, and strategies of resistance with the Pan-African agenda of the UNIA to create a dynamic and multifaceted movement. A testament to the multidimensionality of black political subjectivity, Southern Garveyites fashioned a politics reflective of their international, regional, and local attachments. Moving beyond the usual focus on New York and the charismatic personality of Marcus Garvey, this book situates black workers at the center of its analysis and aims to provide a much-needed grassroots perspective on the Garvey movement. More than simply providing a regional history of one of the most important Pan-African movements of the twentieth century, The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South demonstrates the ways in which racial, class, and spatial dynamics resulted in complex, and at times competing articulations of black nationalism.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The history of the United Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), better known as the Garvey movement, is typically told through the biography of Marcus Garvey. This slim monograph provides insight into the development of the UNIA in three Southern locales, New Orleans, Miami, and Norfolk. Harold (Univ. of Virginia) underscores the diverse motivation of UNIA followers; not all were African nationalists--some were individuals seeking general improvement in the conditions facing African Americans. While local affiliates responded to African nationalism and gave support to the Garvey-led Black Star Line, an ill-fated transportation link to Liberia, many rejected that in favor of economic, political, and social initiatives. A fascinating aspect of the story is the degree to which the Jamaica-born Garvey often failed to attract native-born African Americans, precisely because of his African nationalism. The vignettes of the areas studied are helpful: each had a different reaction to Garvey. Particularly fascinating--if troubling, perhaps--is the degree to which Norfolk-area Garveyites joined with white supremacists. While the book contributes to understanding the UNIA, the writing belies its origin as a thesis. At times, the conclusions to some chapters are introductions to the next. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. F. Armstrong Louisiana State University at Alexandria

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Claudrena N. Harold is an Assistant Professor in the History Department and the Carter G. Woodson Institute at the University of Virginia. Her research and teaching interests include African American social and cultural history, black-nationalist and Pan-African movements, and labor politics.</p>

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