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This Is Called Moving : A Critical Poetics of Film

By: Child, Abigail.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Modern and Contemporary Poetics: Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (317 p.).ISBN: 9780817381301.Subject(s): Child, Abigail | Child, Abigail | Experimental films - History and criticism | Experimental films | Motion pictures | Motion pictures - Aesthetics | Motion pictures - PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: This Is Called Moving : A Critical Poetics of FilmDDC classification: 791.43/611 | 791.43611 LOC classification: PN1995PN1995.9.E96C42 2005Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; Poetry in Motion by Tom Gunning; Preface; Sex Talk; Matrix; Interrogations; Notes; Selected Works by the Author; Index
Summary: Writings on film from an award-winning filmmaker and poet. As the writer, director, producer, and cinematographer of almost all her 30 films, videos, and shorts, Abigail Child has been recognized as a major and influential practitioner of experimental cinema since the early 1970s. Hallmarks of her style are the appropriation and reassembly of found footage and fragments from disparate visual sources, ranging from industrial films and documentaries to home movies, vacation photography, and snippets of old B movies. The resulting collages and montages are cinematic narratives that have been consistently praised for their beauty and sense of wonder and delight in the purely visual. At the same time, Child's films are noted for their incisive political commentary on issues such as gender and sexuality, class, voyeurism, poverty, and the subversive nature of propaganda. In the essays of This Is Called Moving, Child draws on her long career as a practicing poet as well as a filmmaker to explore how these two language systems inform and cross-fertilize her work. For Child, poetry and film are both potent means of representation, and by examining the parallels between them-words and frames, lines and shots, stanzas and scenes-she discovers how the two art forms re-construct and re-present social meaning, both private and collective.
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PN1995 | PN1995.9.E96C42 2005 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=438131 Available EBL438131

Contents; List of Illustrations; Poetry in Motion by Tom Gunning; Preface; Sex Talk; Matrix; Interrogations; Notes; Selected Works by the Author; Index

Writings on film from an award-winning filmmaker and poet. As the writer, director, producer, and cinematographer of almost all her 30 films, videos, and shorts, Abigail Child has been recognized as a major and influential practitioner of experimental cinema since the early 1970s. Hallmarks of her style are the appropriation and reassembly of found footage and fragments from disparate visual sources, ranging from industrial films and documentaries to home movies, vacation photography, and snippets of old B movies. The resulting collages and montages are cinematic narratives that have been consistently praised for their beauty and sense of wonder and delight in the purely visual. At the same time, Child's films are noted for their incisive political commentary on issues such as gender and sexuality, class, voyeurism, poverty, and the subversive nature of propaganda. In the essays of This Is Called Moving, Child draws on her long career as a practicing poet as well as a filmmaker to explore how these two language systems inform and cross-fertilize her work. For Child, poetry and film are both potent means of representation, and by examining the parallels between them-words and frames, lines and shots, stanzas and scenes-she discovers how the two art forms re-construct and re-present social meaning, both private and collective.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a splendidly original collection of essays, comments, and interviews. Child has published books of poetry (Mob, 1994; Scatter Matrix, 1996) in the same venues as the so-called L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E poets, and her writing style sometimes resembles the fragmented but idea-filled paragraphs one finds in the prose of Charles Bernstein (A Poetics, 1992) or Ronald Silliman (The New Sentence, 1987). Here she complicates and expands their work substantially, as she transposes the L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E poet emphasis on writing onto the medium of film. Whereas the L-A-N-G-U-A-G-E poets seem always to be rewriting Gertrude Stein, Child's work seems much more expansive, with a richer range of reference. Bernstein's polemics promise revolution, but his poems seem merely nonsensical and boring. By contrast, Child's polemics seem much more practical, less theatrical, and the poems, prose, and films all feel much more substantial. Including especially moving forays into issues of sexuality, the totality of the book gives a fine description of the potential of experimental filmmaking. Tom Gunning provides a concise, instructive foreword. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. S. C. Dillon Bates College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Abigail Child is Professor of Film and Animation at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and author of A Motive for Mayhem and Artificial Memory. Tom Gunning is Professor of Art History at the University of Chicago and author of D. W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Film: The Early Years at Biograph. </p>

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