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Choosing Craft : The Artist's Viewpoint

By: Douglas, Diane.
Contributor(s): Halper, Vicki.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (334 p.).ISBN: 9780807889923.Subject(s): Artisans - United States | Artisans -- United States -- Anecdotes | Handicraft -- United States -- History | Handicraft - United States - History | HandicraftGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Choosing Craft : The Artist's ViewpointDDC classification: 745.5 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; PART 1: CHOOSING CRAFT; 1 INTEGRATING ART AND LIFE; 2 INHERITING A PATH; 3 RESPONDING TO MATERIALS; PART 2: GETTING AN EDUCATION; 4 TRAINING WITH MASTERS; 5 STUDYING IN THE ACADEMY; 6 LEARNING IN COMMUNITIES; PART 3: MAKING A LIVING; 7 STARTING A BUSINESS; 8 ENGAGING THE MARKET; 9 WORKING FOR INDUSTRY; PART 4: CONFRONTING CRAFT; 10 TESTING TRADITION; 11 CRITIQUING CULTURE; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: Choosing Craft explores the history and practice of American craft through the words of influential artists whose lives, work, and ideas have shaped the field. Editors Vicki Halper and Diane Douglas construct an anecdotal narrative that examines the post-World War II development of modern craft, which came of age alongside modernist painting and sculpture and was greatly influenced by them as well as by traditional and industrial practices. The anthology is organized according to four activities that ground a professional life in craft--inspiration, training, economics, and philosophy. Halper and Douglas mined a wide variety of sources for their material, including artists' published writings, letters, journal entries, exhibition statements, lecture notes, and oral histories. The detailed record they amassed reveals craft's dynamic relationships with painting, sculpture, design, industry, folk and ethnic traditions, hobby craft, and political and social movements. Collectively, these reflections form a social history of craft. Choosing Craft ultimately offers artists' writings and recollections as vital and vivid data that deserve widespread study as a primary resource for those interested in the American art form.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
N6498.H36 C46 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=454800 Available EBL454800

Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; PART 1: CHOOSING CRAFT; 1 INTEGRATING ART AND LIFE; 2 INHERITING A PATH; 3 RESPONDING TO MATERIALS; PART 2: GETTING AN EDUCATION; 4 TRAINING WITH MASTERS; 5 STUDYING IN THE ACADEMY; 6 LEARNING IN COMMUNITIES; PART 3: MAKING A LIVING; 7 STARTING A BUSINESS; 8 ENGAGING THE MARKET; 9 WORKING FOR INDUSTRY; PART 4: CONFRONTING CRAFT; 10 TESTING TRADITION; 11 CRITIQUING CULTURE; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

Choosing Craft explores the history and practice of American craft through the words of influential artists whose lives, work, and ideas have shaped the field. Editors Vicki Halper and Diane Douglas construct an anecdotal narrative that examines the post-World War II development of modern craft, which came of age alongside modernist painting and sculpture and was greatly influenced by them as well as by traditional and industrial practices. The anthology is organized according to four activities that ground a professional life in craft--inspiration, training, economics, and philosophy. Halper and Douglas mined a wide variety of sources for their material, including artists' published writings, letters, journal entries, exhibition statements, lecture notes, and oral histories. The detailed record they amassed reveals craft's dynamic relationships with painting, sculpture, design, industry, folk and ethnic traditions, hobby craft, and political and social movements. Collectively, these reflections form a social history of craft. Choosing Craft ultimately offers artists' writings and recollections as vital and vivid data that deserve widespread study as a primary resource for those interested in the American art form.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is an informal history of the studio art movement since WW II. It includes individual artists' statements, reflecting their philosophies, experiences, and problems in four areas: choosing a craft, getting an education, making a living, and confronting craft (e.g., issues of professional identity). Under these appear subthemes like "Responding to Materials" (part 1), "Study in the Academy" and "Learning in Communities" (part 2), and "Starting a Business" and "Working for Industry" (part 3). The 14 short statements under "Responding to Materials" range from that of George Nakashima on the meaning of wood (1938) to those of Gerhardt Knodel, a creator of textiles, in 2004. By reading selectively, one learns of professional artists' convictions, purposes, and issues of debate--the independent craftsperson versus academics, traditional forms versus experimental--in the ever-changing worlds of ceramics, woodworking, metalwork, glass, fabric, and basketry. Readers also learn about professional societies, such as the Glass Art Society, journals such as Craft Horizons, and schools such as the Rochester Institute of Technology. This book will interest a wide range of readers, from beginners to collectors to historians. An informal but informative overview, it will be useful as assigned or recommended reading for students in crafts classes. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels. J. J. Poesch emerita, Tulane University

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