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Quakers, Jews, and Science : Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, 1650-1900

By: Cantor, Geoffrey.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2005Description: 1 online resource (433 p.).ISBN: 9780191534898.Subject(s): Judaism -- Doctrines | Religion and science -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century | Religion and science -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Religion and science -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | Society of Friends -- DoctrinesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Quakers, Jews, and Science : Religious Responses to Modernity and the Sciences in Britain, 1650-1900DDC classification: 201.65 | 201/.65/09410903 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Abbreviations and Conventions; A Note on Dates; 1 Introduction: Science in 'Dissenting' Religious Communities; 2 Two Communities; 3 Education and Careers; 4 Scientific Institutions; 5 Trajectories in Science; 6 Quaker Attitudes and Practices; 7 Quaker Responses to Evolution; 8 Jewish Attitudes and Practices; 9 Jewish Responses to Evolution; 10 Historical Comparisons and Historiographical Reflections; Appendix 1 Who is to count as a Quaker or as a Jew?; Appendix 2 Oath and Affirmation used at graduation ceremony at Edinburgh University
Appendix 3 Quaker and Jewish Fellows of the Royal Society of LondonBibliography; Index
Summary: How do science and religion interact? This study examines the ways in which two minorities in Britain - the Quaker and Anglo-Jewish communities - engaged with science. Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, much of which has not been analysed by previous historians, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science: scientific research, science education, science-related careers, and scientific institutions. The responses of bothcommunities to the challenge of modernity posed by innovative scientific theories, such as the Newtonian worldview and Darwin's theory of evolution, are of central interest.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BL240.3 .C36 2005 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=679443 Available EBL679443

Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Abbreviations and Conventions; A Note on Dates; 1 Introduction: Science in 'Dissenting' Religious Communities; 2 Two Communities; 3 Education and Careers; 4 Scientific Institutions; 5 Trajectories in Science; 6 Quaker Attitudes and Practices; 7 Quaker Responses to Evolution; 8 Jewish Attitudes and Practices; 9 Jewish Responses to Evolution; 10 Historical Comparisons and Historiographical Reflections; Appendix 1 Who is to count as a Quaker or as a Jew?; Appendix 2 Oath and Affirmation used at graduation ceremony at Edinburgh University

Appendix 3 Quaker and Jewish Fellows of the Royal Society of LondonBibliography; Index

How do science and religion interact? This study examines the ways in which two minorities in Britain - the Quaker and Anglo-Jewish communities - engaged with science. Drawing on a wealth of documentary material, much of which has not been analysed by previous historians, Geoffrey Cantor charts the participation of Quakers and Jews in many different aspects of science: scientific research, science education, science-related careers, and scientific institutions. The responses of bothcommunities to the challenge of modernity posed by innovative scientific theories, such as the Newtonian worldview and Darwin's theory of evolution, are of central interest.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Geoffrey Cantor is Professor of the History of Science, University of Leeds.

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