Playing to the Camera : Musicians and Musical Performance in Documentary Cinema

By: Cohen, ThomasMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (161 p.)ISBN: 9780231501804Subject(s): Documentary films -- History and criticism | Motion picture music | Music -- PerformanceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Playing to the Camera : Musicians and Musical Performance in Documentary CinemaDDC classification: 070.18 LOC classification: PN1995.9 .D6 C5345 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Introduction: In Praise of Performance; 1 Cool Jazz, Hot Jazz and Hard Bop on a Summer's Day; 2 Wild Guitarists and Spastic Singers: Virtuosic Performance on Film; 3 Direct Cinema, Rock's Public Persona and the Emergence of the Rock Star; 4 Instrumental Technique and Facial Expression On Screen; 5 Independent Cinema Meets Free Jazz: Shirley Clarke's Ornette: Made in America; 6 'I'm Looking at Them and They're Looking at Me': Observation and Communication in Sex Pistols: Live at the Longhorn; Conclusion: Simple Gestures and Smooth Spaces in Robert Cahen's Boulez-Repons
BibliographyIndex
Summary: Playing to the Camera is the first full-length study devoted to the musical performance documentary. Its scope ranges from music education films to punk rock concert films to experimental video art featuring modernist music. Unlike the ?music under' produced for movies by anonymous musicians sequestered in recording studios, on-screen ?live' performances remind us of the relation between music and the bodies that produce it. Leaving aside analysis of the film score to explore the link between moving images and musical movement as physical gesture, this volume asks why performance has so often been derided as a mere skill whereas composition is afforded the status of art, a question that opens onto a broader critique of attitudes regarding mental and physical labor in Western culture.
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Contents; Preface; Introduction: In Praise of Performance; 1 Cool Jazz, Hot Jazz and Hard Bop on a Summer's Day; 2 Wild Guitarists and Spastic Singers: Virtuosic Performance on Film; 3 Direct Cinema, Rock's Public Persona and the Emergence of the Rock Star; 4 Instrumental Technique and Facial Expression On Screen; 5 Independent Cinema Meets Free Jazz: Shirley Clarke's Ornette: Made in America; 6 'I'm Looking at Them and They're Looking at Me': Observation and Communication in Sex Pistols: Live at the Longhorn; Conclusion: Simple Gestures and Smooth Spaces in Robert Cahen's Boulez-Repons

BibliographyIndex

Playing to the Camera is the first full-length study devoted to the musical performance documentary. Its scope ranges from music education films to punk rock concert films to experimental video art featuring modernist music. Unlike the ?music under' produced for movies by anonymous musicians sequestered in recording studios, on-screen ?live' performances remind us of the relation between music and the bodies that produce it. Leaving aside analysis of the film score to explore the link between moving images and musical movement as physical gesture, this volume asks why performance has so often been derided as a mere skill whereas composition is afforded the status of art, a question that opens onto a broader critique of attitudes regarding mental and physical labor in Western culture.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Thomas F. Cohen teaches in the Communication Department at the University of Tampa. He has published on broadcasting and film, documentary cinema, and audiovisual technology.

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