Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Robert Southwell : Snow in Arcadia: Redrawing the English Lyric Landscape, 1586-95

By: Sweeney, Anne R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Manchester : Manchester University Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (325 p.).ISBN: 9781847791917.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Robert Southwell : Snow in Arcadia: Redrawing the English Lyric Landscape, 1586-95DDC classification: 821.3 LOC classification: PR2349.S5 | S944 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
9780719074189; 9780719074189; Copyright; Contents; Preface and acknowledgements; Introduction Ben Jonson's admiration for Southwell's'Burning Babe'; Chapter 1 Rome: the discernment of angels; Chapter 2 The Spiritual Exercises: the 'inward eie'; Chapter 3 Hidden ways and secret veins: into England; Chapter 4 The flight of angels: England's altered confidence; Chapter 5 Snow in Arcadia: rewriting the English lyric landscape; Chapter 6 Southwell's war of words; Chapter 7 The 'performing Word': Southwell's sacralised poetic; Chapter 8 Conclusion; Bibliography; Index
Summary: It has traditionally been held that Robert Southwell's poetry offers a curious view of Elizabethan England, one that is from the restricted perspective of a priest-hole. This book dismantles that idea by examining the poetry, word by word, discovering layers of new meanings, hidden emblems, and sharp critiques of Elizabeth's courtiers, and even of the ageing queen herself.Using both the most recent edition of Southwell's poetry and manuscript materials, it addresses both poetry and private writings including letters and diary material to give dramatic context to the radicalisation of a generation of Southwell's countrymen and women, showing how the young Jesuit harnessed both drama and literature to give new poetic poignancy to their experience. Bringing a rigorously forensic approach to Southwell's 'lighter' pieces, Sweeney can now show to what extent Southwell engaged exclusively through them in direct artistic debate with Spenser, Sidney, and Shakespeare, placing the poetry firmly in the English landscape familiar to Southwell's generation. Those interested in early modern and Elizabethan culture will find much of interest, including new insights into the function of the arts in the private Catholic milieu touched by Southwell in so many ways and places.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR2349.S5 S944 2006 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1069566 Available EBL1069566

9780719074189; 9780719074189; Copyright; Contents; Preface and acknowledgements; Introduction Ben Jonson's admiration for Southwell's'Burning Babe'; Chapter 1 Rome: the discernment of angels; Chapter 2 The Spiritual Exercises: the 'inward eie'; Chapter 3 Hidden ways and secret veins: into England; Chapter 4 The flight of angels: England's altered confidence; Chapter 5 Snow in Arcadia: rewriting the English lyric landscape; Chapter 6 Southwell's war of words; Chapter 7 The 'performing Word': Southwell's sacralised poetic; Chapter 8 Conclusion; Bibliography; Index

It has traditionally been held that Robert Southwell's poetry offers a curious view of Elizabethan England, one that is from the restricted perspective of a priest-hole. This book dismantles that idea by examining the poetry, word by word, discovering layers of new meanings, hidden emblems, and sharp critiques of Elizabeth's courtiers, and even of the ageing queen herself.Using both the most recent edition of Southwell's poetry and manuscript materials, it addresses both poetry and private writings including letters and diary material to give dramatic context to the radicalisation of a generation of Southwell's countrymen and women, showing how the young Jesuit harnessed both drama and literature to give new poetic poignancy to their experience. Bringing a rigorously forensic approach to Southwell's 'lighter' pieces, Sweeney can now show to what extent Southwell engaged exclusively through them in direct artistic debate with Spenser, Sidney, and Shakespeare, placing the poetry firmly in the English landscape familiar to Southwell's generation. Those interested in early modern and Elizabethan culture will find much of interest, including new insights into the function of the arts in the private Catholic milieu touched by Southwell in so many ways and places.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Anne R. Sweeney taught English at Lancaster University. Her interests included renaissance art and literature and writing poetry

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.