Autobiographical, Scientific, Religious, Moral, and Literary Writings.

By: Rousseau, JeanContributor(s): Kelly, ChristopherMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandCollected Writings of Rousseau: Publisher: Lebanon : Dartmouth College Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (361 p.)ISBN: 9781611682823Subject(s): Authors, French -- 18th century -- Biography | Philosophy in literature | Rousseau, Jean-Jacques | Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, 1712-1778Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Autobiographical, Scientific, Religious, Moral, and Literary WritingsDDC classification: 194 | 848/.509 LOC classification: PQ2034 .K45 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Chronology of Works in Volume 12; Introduction; Note on the Text; Autobiographical Writings; Autobiographical Poems; The Orchard of Madame the Baronne de Warens; Letter to M. Bordes; Enigma; Letter to Monsieur Parisot; Quatrain for One of His Portraits; The Banterer; Biographical Fragment; My Portrait; Response to the Letters Written from the Mountain, Published at Geneva, under this title: Sentiment of the Citizens; Notes for the Reveries; On the Art of Enjoying and Other Fragments; Various Writings; Travel Notebook
[Declaration Intended for a Journal]Memorative Note on the Illness and Death of M. Deschamps; Sentiments of the Public Toward Me in the Various Estates that Compose It; Declaration Relative to DiVerent Reprints of His Works; Memorandum Written in the Month of February 1777; Writings on Science; Course on Geography; Response to the Anonymous Memorandum; Memorandum Presented to M. de Mably on the Education of M. his Son; Plan for the Education of Monsieur de Sainte-Marie; Rousseau to the abbé Guillaume-Thomas-François Raynal; Treatise on the Sphere; The New Daedalus
Writings on Religion and MoralityFragments on God and Revelation; On God; Prayers; Memorandum Delivered April 19, 1742, to Monsignor Boudet, Antonine; Fiction or Allegorical Fragment on Revelation; Fragment on the Infinite Power of God; Moral Letters; Notes on Helvétius's On the Mind; Literary Works; Queen Whimsical; The Loves of Claire and Marcellin; The Little Savoyard; or, The Life of Claude Noyer; On Eloquence; Idea of Method in the Composition of a Book; Lexicological Remarks; On Women; A Household on rue Saint-Denis
Essay on the Important Events of Which Women Have Been the Secret CauseAdvice to a Curate; Funeral Oration for His Most Serene Highness Monseigneur The Duke of Orléans; Letters to Sara; Remarks on the Letters on the English and the French; Various Fragments; Notes; Index
Summary: Noteworthy short pieces from Rousseau, most of which have never been translated into English before now.
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Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Chronology of Works in Volume 12; Introduction; Note on the Text; Autobiographical Writings; Autobiographical Poems; The Orchard of Madame the Baronne de Warens; Letter to M. Bordes; Enigma; Letter to Monsieur Parisot; Quatrain for One of His Portraits; The Banterer; Biographical Fragment; My Portrait; Response to the Letters Written from the Mountain, Published at Geneva, under this title: Sentiment of the Citizens; Notes for the Reveries; On the Art of Enjoying and Other Fragments; Various Writings; Travel Notebook

[Declaration Intended for a Journal]Memorative Note on the Illness and Death of M. Deschamps; Sentiments of the Public Toward Me in the Various Estates that Compose It; Declaration Relative to DiVerent Reprints of His Works; Memorandum Written in the Month of February 1777; Writings on Science; Course on Geography; Response to the Anonymous Memorandum; Memorandum Presented to M. de Mably on the Education of M. his Son; Plan for the Education of Monsieur de Sainte-Marie; Rousseau to the abbé Guillaume-Thomas-François Raynal; Treatise on the Sphere; The New Daedalus

Writings on Religion and MoralityFragments on God and Revelation; On God; Prayers; Memorandum Delivered April 19, 1742, to Monsignor Boudet, Antonine; Fiction or Allegorical Fragment on Revelation; Fragment on the Infinite Power of God; Moral Letters; Notes on Helvétius's On the Mind; Literary Works; Queen Whimsical; The Loves of Claire and Marcellin; The Little Savoyard; or, The Life of Claude Noyer; On Eloquence; Idea of Method in the Composition of a Book; Lexicological Remarks; On Women; A Household on rue Saint-Denis

Essay on the Important Events of Which Women Have Been the Secret CauseAdvice to a Curate; Funeral Oration for His Most Serene Highness Monseigneur The Duke of Orléans; Letters to Sara; Remarks on the Letters on the English and the French; Various Fragments; Notes; Index

Noteworthy short pieces from Rousseau, most of which have never been translated into English before now.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jean Jacques Rousseau was a Swiss philosopher and political theorist who lived much of his life in France. Many reference books describe him as French, but he generally added "Citizen of Geneva" whenever he signed his name. He presented his theory of education in Emile (1762), a novel, the first book to link the educational process to a scientific understanding of children; Rousseau is thus regarded as the precursor, if not the founder, of child psychology. "The greatest good is not authority, but liberty," he wrote, and in The Social Contract (1762) Rousseau moved from a study of the individual to an analysis of the relationship of the individual to the state: "The art of politics consists of making each citizen extremely dependent upon the polis in order to free him from dependence upon other citizens." This doctrine of sovereignty, the absolute supremacy of the state over its members, has led many to accuse Rousseau of opening the doors to despotism, collectivism, and totalitarianism. Others say that this is the opposite of Rousseau's intent, that the surrender of rights is only apparent, and that in the end individuals retain the rights that they appear to have given up. In effect, these Rousseau supporters say, the social contract is designed to secure or to restore to individuals in the state of civilization the equivalent of the rights they enjoyed in the state of nature. Rousseau was a passionate man who lived in passionate times, and he still stirs passion in those who write about him today.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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