Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Deep Ellum : The Other Side of Dallas

By: Govenar, Alan B.
Contributor(s): Brakefield, Jay F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.John and Robin Dickson Series in Texas Music, sponsored by the Center for Texas Music History, Texas State University: Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (322 p.).ISBN: 9781603449595.Subject(s): African Americans -- Texas -- Dallas -- Music -- History and criticism | Dallas (Tex.) -- Social life and customs | Deep Ellum (Dallas, Tex.) -- History | Popular music -- Texas -- Dallas -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Deep Ellum : The Other Side of DallasDDC classification: 781.64097642812 LOC classification: ML3477.8.D35 .G68 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Introduction; Chapter 1. "Deep Elem Blues": Song of the Street; Chapter 2. The Railroads Create Deep Ellum; Chapter 3. William Sidney Pittman: Architect of Deep Ellum; Chapter 4. Black Dallas; Chapter 5. Jewish Pawnbrokers and Merchants of Deep Ellum; Chapter 6. Blind Lemon Jefferson: Downhome Blues; Chapter 7. The Contemporaries of Blind Lemon; Chapter 8. Blind Willie Johnson and Arizona Dranes: The; Chapter 9. Alex Moore: Dallas Piano Blues; Chapter 10. Buster Smith: Dallas Jazz Goes to Kansas City and New York
Chapter 11. Marvin Montgomery: The Cross-Fertilization of White and Black Musical StylesChapter 12. The Contemporaries of Marvin Montgomery: Western Swing, Texas Fiddling, and the Big "D" Jamboree; Chapter 13. Benny Binion: Gambling and the Policy Racket; Chapter 14. Deep Ellum's Just Too Doggone Slow: Decline and Rebirth; Notes; Selected Discography; Bibliography; Index; Other titles in the John and Robin Dickson Series in Texas Music
Summary: Deep Ellum, on the eastern edge of downtown Dallas, retains its character as an alternative to the city's staid image with loft apartments, art galleries, nightclubs, and tattoo shops. It first sprang up as a ramshackle business district with saloons and variety theatres and evolved, during the early decades of the twentieth century, into a place where the black and white worlds of Dallas converged. This book strips away layers of myth to illuminate the cultural milieu that spawned such seminal blues and jazz musicians as Blind Lemon Jefferson, Buster Smith, and T-Bone Walker and that was also an incubator for the growth of western swing.Expanding upon the original 1998 publication, this Texas A&M University Press edition offers new research on Deep Ellum's vital cross-fertilization of white and black musical styles, many additional rare historical photographs, and an updated account of the area in the early years of the twenty-first century.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML3477.8.D35 .G68 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1433356 Available EBL1433356

Contents; Preface; Introduction; Chapter 1. "Deep Elem Blues": Song of the Street; Chapter 2. The Railroads Create Deep Ellum; Chapter 3. William Sidney Pittman: Architect of Deep Ellum; Chapter 4. Black Dallas; Chapter 5. Jewish Pawnbrokers and Merchants of Deep Ellum; Chapter 6. Blind Lemon Jefferson: Downhome Blues; Chapter 7. The Contemporaries of Blind Lemon; Chapter 8. Blind Willie Johnson and Arizona Dranes: The; Chapter 9. Alex Moore: Dallas Piano Blues; Chapter 10. Buster Smith: Dallas Jazz Goes to Kansas City and New York

Chapter 11. Marvin Montgomery: The Cross-Fertilization of White and Black Musical StylesChapter 12. The Contemporaries of Marvin Montgomery: Western Swing, Texas Fiddling, and the Big "D" Jamboree; Chapter 13. Benny Binion: Gambling and the Policy Racket; Chapter 14. Deep Ellum's Just Too Doggone Slow: Decline and Rebirth; Notes; Selected Discography; Bibliography; Index; Other titles in the John and Robin Dickson Series in Texas Music

Deep Ellum, on the eastern edge of downtown Dallas, retains its character as an alternative to the city's staid image with loft apartments, art galleries, nightclubs, and tattoo shops. It first sprang up as a ramshackle business district with saloons and variety theatres and evolved, during the early decades of the twentieth century, into a place where the black and white worlds of Dallas converged. This book strips away layers of myth to illuminate the cultural milieu that spawned such seminal blues and jazz musicians as Blind Lemon Jefferson, Buster Smith, and T-Bone Walker and that was also an incubator for the growth of western swing.Expanding upon the original 1998 publication, this Texas A&M University Press edition offers new research on Deep Ellum's vital cross-fertilization of white and black musical styles, many additional rare historical photographs, and an updated account of the area in the early years of the twenty-first century.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a return visit to that Dallas community of black musicians and Jewish shopkeepers (along with crime, poverty, saloons, bigotry, and politics), escorted by the same team. The first trip was 15 years ago (Deep Ellum and Central Track, CH, May'99, 36-5000). One still finds those classic figures from the first quarter of the last century, updated as needed, both African American and Caucasian, sometimes influencing one another: bluesmen Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Willie Johnson, and Alex Moore; jazzmen Buster Smith and Alphonso Trent; gospel singer Arizona Dranes; country music figures Marvin Montgomery, the Light Crust Doughboys, and the Cowboy Ramblers. The book is lavishly illustrated (Govenar is a journalist, photographer, and filmmaker) with photographs, record labels, and newspaper advertisements, all of which support an engaging text. What particularly justifies this second edition are the 50 pages of disciplined discography with labels, dates, and personnel of those 78 rpm discs from Brunswick, Columbia, Victor, and Vocalion that gave sonoric documentation to the work of so many individuals from earlier days who had connections with Dallas history. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. D.-R. de Lerma Lawrence University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.