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Phillis Wheatley : Biography of a Genius in Bondage

By: Carretta, Vincent.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Sarah Mills Hodge Fund Publication: Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (318 p.).ISBN: 9780820347042.Subject(s): African American women poets -- Biography | Poets, American -- Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775 -- Biography | Slaves -- United States -- Biography | Wheatley, Phillis, 1753-1784Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Phillis Wheatley : Biography of a Genius in BondageDDC classification: 811.1 | 811/.1 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; One: "On Being Brought from Africa to America"; Two: "Thoughts on the Works of Providence"; Three: "I prefer the Verse"; Four: "A wonder of the Age indeed!"; Five: "A Farewell to America"; Six: "Now upon my own Footing"; Seven: "The uncertain duration of all things Temporal"; Afterword; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: With Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773), Phillis Wheatley (1753?-1784) became the first English-speaking person of African descent to publish a book and only the second woman-of any race or background- to do so in America. Written in Boston while she was just a teenager, and when she was still a slave, Wheatley's work was an international sensation. In Phillis Wheatley , Vincent Carretta offers the first full-length biography of a figure whose origins and later life have remained shadowy despite her iconic status. A scholar with extensive knowledge of transatlantic literature and history, Carretta uncovers new details about Wheatley's origins, her upbringing, and how she gained freedom. Carretta solves the mystery of John Peters, correcting the record of when he and Wheatley married and revealing what became of him after her death. Assessing Wheatley's entire body of work, Carretta discusses the likely role she played in the production, market­ing, and distribution of her writing. Wheatley developed a remarkable transatlantic network that transcended racial, class, political, religious, and geographical boundaries. Carretta reconstructs that network and sheds new light on her religious and political identities. In the course of his research he discovered the earliest poem attributable to Wheatley and has included it and other unpublished poems in the biography. Carretta relocates Wheatley from the margins to the center of her eighteenth-century transatlantic world, revealing the fascinating life of a woman who rose from the indignity of enslavement to earn wide recognition, only to die in obscurity a few years later.
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PS866.W5 Z5827 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1630844 Available EBL1630844

Cover; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; One: "On Being Brought from Africa to America"; Two: "Thoughts on the Works of Providence"; Three: "I prefer the Verse"; Four: "A wonder of the Age indeed!"; Five: "A Farewell to America"; Six: "Now upon my own Footing"; Seven: "The uncertain duration of all things Temporal"; Afterword; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

With Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral (1773), Phillis Wheatley (1753?-1784) became the first English-speaking person of African descent to publish a book and only the second woman-of any race or background- to do so in America. Written in Boston while she was just a teenager, and when she was still a slave, Wheatley's work was an international sensation. In Phillis Wheatley , Vincent Carretta offers the first full-length biography of a figure whose origins and later life have remained shadowy despite her iconic status. A scholar with extensive knowledge of transatlantic literature and history, Carretta uncovers new details about Wheatley's origins, her upbringing, and how she gained freedom. Carretta solves the mystery of John Peters, correcting the record of when he and Wheatley married and revealing what became of him after her death. Assessing Wheatley's entire body of work, Carretta discusses the likely role she played in the production, market­ing, and distribution of her writing. Wheatley developed a remarkable transatlantic network that transcended racial, class, political, religious, and geographical boundaries. Carretta reconstructs that network and sheds new light on her religious and political identities. In the course of his research he discovered the earliest poem attributable to Wheatley and has included it and other unpublished poems in the biography. Carretta relocates Wheatley from the margins to the center of her eighteenth-century transatlantic world, revealing the fascinating life of a woman who rose from the indignity of enslavement to earn wide recognition, only to die in obscurity a few years later.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Which carefully analyzes the poems while uncovering new material about Wheatley's life, tells us a lot more. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Marking "the 250th anniversary of Wheatley's arrival in Boston from Africa," Carretta (Univ. of Maryland) has written what he claims is the first full-length biography of Wheatley (1753-84), "the first person of African descent in the Americas to publish a book." Carretta's ultimate purpose in writing the study is to "reconstruct the religious and political contexts within and about which she often wrote." The penultimate purpose is "to fill in the significant gaps of her short life," a life that until now, the author writes, "has remained a mystery." In seven chapters, Carretta addresses various aspects of Wheatley's life and writings. He seeks to deduce her origin: from which African country did she hail? He tries to show how she, an African writing in the 18th century, gained "transatlantic fame." Finally, he pronounces her an innovator and not an imitator. Carretta's final wish for this volume is that it bring Wheatley "the recognition and status she deserves as a heroic figure in an age of heroes." Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. R. A. Bess Morris College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

VINCENT CARRETTA is a professor of English at the University of Maryland. He is the author or editor of more than ten books, including scholarly editions of the writings of Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, Ignatius Sancho, and Ottobah Cugoano. His most recent books are Equiano, the African: Biography of a Self-Made Man , winner of the Annibel Jenkins Prize, and The Life and Letters of Philip Quaque, the First African Anglican Missionary , coedited with Ty M. Reese (both Georgia).

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