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Truman Capote : A Literary Life at the Movies

By: Pugh, Tison.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.The South on Screen: Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (304 p.).ISBN: 9780820347097.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Truman Capote : A Literary Life at the MoviesDDC classification: 813.54 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Cinema Stills and Photographs; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; 1 Capote and the Cinema: An Overview; 2 Capote in the Queer House of Fame: Stars and Celebrity Personas; 3 Scriptwriter for the Stars: Capote's Screen Adaptations of Indiscretion of an American Wife, Beat the Devil, and The Innocents; 4 Holly Golightly's Queer World: Blake Edwards's Breakfast at Tiffany's; 5 Capote, Crime, and Capital Punishment: Richard Brooks's In Cold Blood; 6 Turning a Princess into a Star: Capote, Lee Bouvier Radziwill, and Laura
7 Capote for the Holidays: A Christmas Memory (and Trilogy), The Thanksgiving Visitor, and One Christmas8 Capote's Southern Childhoods: Other Voices, Other Rooms, The Grass Harp, and Children on Their Birthdays; 9 Capote's Unfinished Business: Abandoned and Unproduced Projects; 10 Playing Capote: Tru, Capote, Infamous, and Other Parodic and Iconic Portrayals; Notes; Cinema Capoteana; Works Cited; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z
Summary: Truman Capote once remarked, "My primary thing is that I'm a prose writer. I don't think film is the greatest living thing"; nonetheless, his legacy is in many ways defined by his complex relationship with cinema, Hollywood, and celebrity itself. In Truman Capote: A Literary Life at the Movies , Tison Pugh explores the author and his literature through a cinematic lens, skillfully weaving the most relevant elements of Capote's biography- including his highly flamboyant public persona and his friendships and feuds with notable stars-with insightful critical analysis of the films, screenplays, and adaptations of his works that composed his fraught relationship with the Hollywood machine. Capote's masterful short stories and novels ensure his status as an iconic author of the twentieth century, and his screenplays, including Beat the Devil , Indiscretion of an American Wife , and The Innocents , allowed him to collaborate with such Hollywood heavyweights as Humphrey Bogart, John Huston, and David O. Selznick. Throughout his professional life he circulated freely in a celebrity milieu populated by such notables as Marlon Brando, Elizabeth Taylor, and Marilyn Monroe. Cinematic adaptations of his literature, most notably Breakfast at Tiffany's and In Cold Blood , play with or otherwise alter Capote's queer literary themes, often bleaching his daring treatment of homosexuality in favor of heterosexual romance. Truman Capote: A Literary Life at the Movies reveals Capote's literary works to be not merely coincident to film but integral to their mutual creation, paying keen attention to the ways in which Capote's identity as a gay southerner influenced his and others' perceptions of his literature and its adaptations. Pugh's research illuminates Capote's personal and professional successes and disappointments in the film industry, helping to create a more nuanced portrait of the author and bringing fresh details to light.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS3505.A59 P844 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1665604 Available EBL1665604

Cover; Contents; List of Cinema Stills and Photographs; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; 1 Capote and the Cinema: An Overview; 2 Capote in the Queer House of Fame: Stars and Celebrity Personas; 3 Scriptwriter for the Stars: Capote's Screen Adaptations of Indiscretion of an American Wife, Beat the Devil, and The Innocents; 4 Holly Golightly's Queer World: Blake Edwards's Breakfast at Tiffany's; 5 Capote, Crime, and Capital Punishment: Richard Brooks's In Cold Blood; 6 Turning a Princess into a Star: Capote, Lee Bouvier Radziwill, and Laura

7 Capote for the Holidays: A Christmas Memory (and Trilogy), The Thanksgiving Visitor, and One Christmas8 Capote's Southern Childhoods: Other Voices, Other Rooms, The Grass Harp, and Children on Their Birthdays; 9 Capote's Unfinished Business: Abandoned and Unproduced Projects; 10 Playing Capote: Tru, Capote, Infamous, and Other Parodic and Iconic Portrayals; Notes; Cinema Capoteana; Works Cited; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Z

Truman Capote once remarked, "My primary thing is that I'm a prose writer. I don't think film is the greatest living thing"; nonetheless, his legacy is in many ways defined by his complex relationship with cinema, Hollywood, and celebrity itself. In Truman Capote: A Literary Life at the Movies , Tison Pugh explores the author and his literature through a cinematic lens, skillfully weaving the most relevant elements of Capote's biography- including his highly flamboyant public persona and his friendships and feuds with notable stars-with insightful critical analysis of the films, screenplays, and adaptations of his works that composed his fraught relationship with the Hollywood machine. Capote's masterful short stories and novels ensure his status as an iconic author of the twentieth century, and his screenplays, including Beat the Devil , Indiscretion of an American Wife , and The Innocents , allowed him to collaborate with such Hollywood heavyweights as Humphrey Bogart, John Huston, and David O. Selznick. Throughout his professional life he circulated freely in a celebrity milieu populated by such notables as Marlon Brando, Elizabeth Taylor, and Marilyn Monroe. Cinematic adaptations of his literature, most notably Breakfast at Tiffany's and In Cold Blood , play with or otherwise alter Capote's queer literary themes, often bleaching his daring treatment of homosexuality in favor of heterosexual romance. Truman Capote: A Literary Life at the Movies reveals Capote's literary works to be not merely coincident to film but integral to their mutual creation, paying keen attention to the ways in which Capote's identity as a gay southerner influenced his and others' perceptions of his literature and its adaptations. Pugh's research illuminates Capote's personal and professional successes and disappointments in the film industry, helping to create a more nuanced portrait of the author and bringing fresh details to light.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Pugh's (English, Univ. of Central Florida; Queer Chivalry) latest is the piece of film history that you didn't even know that your library was missing. It's a fascinating look at the effect of -Truman Capote's literature (In Cold Blood) and scriptwriting on film, sprinkled with allusions to his increasing cheekiness in regards to movies of his time (1924-84). The title includes smart discussions, answering such questions as how Breakfast at Tiffany's made it to the big screen when Capote had such reservations about adapting literature to film. Pugh explores how the author's sexuality permeated his writing and what that meant when translated into mainstream movies. This book is not for those seeking a quick read or a photo-filled tome, but for a fresh perspective on the meeting of literature and film, look no further. VERDICT This book expertly explains how film studies, film history, and queer theory all converge in the charismatic Capote. A must for anyone interested in seeing the connections between film adaptations and quintessential Capote literature.-Jennifer Thompson, Richland Lib., Columbia, SC (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In this study of Capote's screenplays, Pugh (English, University of Central Florida; coeditor, with Kathleen Coyne Kelly, of Queer Movie Medievalisms, 2009) foregrounds the writer's homosexuality as the ethical center of his scripts. Other critics, notably Capote's biographer Gerald Clarke (Capote: A Biography, 1988), do not evade the topic, but here homosexuality becomes the raison d'être. A particularly convincing account of Beat the Devil (1954) combines biographical data, Capote's relationships with his colleagues, and the happily resolved ending to the 89-minute film (though Pugh writes that this does not negate the "topsy turvy" nature of the rest of the narrative). Capote's 1968 rewriting for television of the Preminger classic Laura (1944) emphasized the homosexual orientation of the obsessed Waldo Lydecker (played by Clifton Webb in the 1944 film). And Pugh notes the "queer" sensibility of Montgomery Clift, star of another Capote script, Indiscretion of an American Housewife. In addition, Pugh takes issue with the "Hollywoodization," or altering, of Capote's literary approach. This is not a book for those who find nontraditional, ideology-centered literary study unacceptable. Pugh illustrates his points with black-and-white stills from the films. --Allan Hirsh, Central Connecticut State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

TISON PUGH is a professor of English at the University of Central Florida. He is the author of Queer Chivalry: Medievalism and the Myth of White Masculinity in Southern Literature , and Queering Medieval Genres and coeditor of Queer Movie Medievalisms , among other titles.

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