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Literary Sociability in Early Modern England : The Epistolary Record

By: Trolander, Paul.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lanham : University of Delaware, 2014Description: 1 online resource (305 p.).ISBN: 9781611494983.Subject(s): English letters -- History and criticism | Letter writing -- Great Britain -- History -- 17th century | Letter writing -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Literature and society -- England -- History -- 17th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Literary Sociability in Early Modern England : The Epistolary RecordDDC classification: 826.309 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Figures; Tables; Acknowledgments; 1 Changing the Way We Theorize Early Modern Literary Sociability; 2 Technologies, Infrastructure, and Class; 3 Finding One's Place in the Early Modern Literary Field; 4 Making Sense of the Conversational and Cooperative Aspects of Literary Networking; 5 Subject Positions in Early Modern Literary Networks; 6 Cooperative Aspects of Early Modern Literary Activity; 7 Cultural Capital Formation Among Early Modern Literary Networks; 8 The Cultural Economics of Brokering within Literary Networks; Appendix; Bibliography; Index; About the Author
Summary: Using the letter as its main evidence, Literary Sociability in Early Modern England: The Epistolary Record examines early-modern English literary networks, especially during the period 1620 to 1720, finding that author manuscripts were increasingly understood as seedbeds of knowledge production and humanistic creativity and therefore as natural predecessors to print. Early modern authors, patrons and even regulators cultivated the letter and theories of friendship to build literary networks that could collaborate on writing projects with strong cultural appeal. By being associated with texts of high cultural value, network participants accrued social capital that could be used to attract state or religious patronage, professional stature among other writers, and financial gains in the marketplace.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR914 .L384 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1707321 Available EBL1707321

Contents; Figures; Tables; Acknowledgments; 1 Changing the Way We Theorize Early Modern Literary Sociability; 2 Technologies, Infrastructure, and Class; 3 Finding One's Place in the Early Modern Literary Field; 4 Making Sense of the Conversational and Cooperative Aspects of Literary Networking; 5 Subject Positions in Early Modern Literary Networks; 6 Cooperative Aspects of Early Modern Literary Activity; 7 Cultural Capital Formation Among Early Modern Literary Networks; 8 The Cultural Economics of Brokering within Literary Networks; Appendix; Bibliography; Index; About the Author

Using the letter as its main evidence, Literary Sociability in Early Modern England: The Epistolary Record examines early-modern English literary networks, especially during the period 1620 to 1720, finding that author manuscripts were increasingly understood as seedbeds of knowledge production and humanistic creativity and therefore as natural predecessors to print. Early modern authors, patrons and even regulators cultivated the letter and theories of friendship to build literary networks that could collaborate on writing projects with strong cultural appeal. By being associated with texts of high cultural value, network participants accrued social capital that could be used to attract state or religious patronage, professional stature among other writers, and financial gains in the marketplace.

Description based upon print version of record.

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