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Henry James and the Language of Experience.

By: Meissner, Collin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1999Description: 1 online resource (249 p.).ISBN: 9780511050732.Subject(s): Aesthetics | Consciousness in literature | Experience in literature | James, Henry | Language and languages | Language and languages - Political aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Henry James and the Language of ExperienceDDC classification: 813.4 | 813/.4 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preliminaries; Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1 The experience of Jamesian hermeneutics; Chapter 2 The experience of divestiture: toward an understanding of the self in The American; Chapter 3 Bondage and boundaries: Isabel Archer''s failed experience; Chapter 4 Lambert Strether and the negativity of experience; Chapter 5 Recovery and revelation: the experience of self-exposure in James''s autobiography; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Explores Henry James''s attitude to the everyday fact of experience, and its relevance for his aesthetic.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS2127.P6 M45 1999eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=142389 Available EBL142389

Preliminaries; Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1 The experience of Jamesian hermeneutics; Chapter 2 The experience of divestiture: toward an understanding of the self in The American; Chapter 3 Bondage and boundaries: Isabel Archer''s failed experience; Chapter 4 Lambert Strether and the negativity of experience; Chapter 5 Recovery and revelation: the experience of self-exposure in James''s autobiography; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Explores Henry James''s attitude to the everyday fact of experience, and its relevance for his aesthetic.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

James was derided as a passive aesthete in New Essays on The Portrait of a Lady, ed. by Joel Porte (CH, Sep'90), but described as an active participant in life by John Carlos Rowe in The Theoretical Dimensions of Henry James (CH, May'85). Meissner (Univ. of Notre Dame) sides with the latter in a study that is often frustratingly opaque but eventually makes the interesting point that James essentially wrote the same novel over and over again, deliberately stranding his protagonists between one culture and another, leaving them with an understanding of life's inherent uncertainty. Such is the fate of the protagonists of all his work, from early to late: in The American (1877), the protagonist is stranded between France and the US; in The Portrait of a Lady (1891), between England and Italy; in The Ambassadors (1903), again between France and the US. Meissner writes that this understanding of uncertainty "allows one to achieve an ethical condition of openness indispensable for a good life . . . prepares one for the alien and frees one from the constraints of having to imprison what is strange within a self-serving certitude . . . [and] prevents one from ever being caught by surprise." For large research collections. D. Kirby; Florida State University

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