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Anger, Revolution, and Romanticism.

By: Stauffer, Andrew M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Cambridge Studies in Romanticism: Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2005Description: 1 online resource (233 p.).ISBN: 9780511113031.Subject(s): Anger in literature | English literature -- 19th century -- History and criticism | English literature -- French influences | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Influence | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Literature and the revolution | Revolutions in literature | Romanticism -- Great BritainGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Anger, Revolution, and RomanticismDDC classification: 820.9/358 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Introduction: fits of rage -- CHAPTER 1 Towards Romantic anger -- CHAPTER 2 Burke, Coleridge, and the rage for indignation -- CHAPTER 3 Inflammatory reactions -- CHAPTER 4 Provocation and the plot of anger -- CHAPTER 5 Shelley and the masks of anger -- CHAPTER 6 Byron's curse -- Epilogue -- Notes -- INTRODUCTION : FITS OF RAGE -- 1 TOWARDS ROMANTIC ANGER -- 2 BURKE, COLERIDGE, AND THE RAGE FOR INDIGNATION -- 3 INFLAMMATORY REACTIONS -- 4 PROVOCATION AND THE PLOT OF ANGER
5 SHELLEY AND THE MASKS OF ANGER -- 6 BYRON'S CURSE -- EPILOGUE -- Bibliography -- Index
Summary: The Romantic age was one of anger and its consequences: revolution and reaction, terror and war. Andrew M. Stauffer explores the changing place of anger in the literature and culture of the period, as English men and women rethought their relationship to the aggressive passions in the wake of the French Revolution. Drawing on diverse fields and discourses such as aesthetics, politics, medicine and the law and tracing the classical legacy the Romantics inherited, Stauffer charts the period's struggle to define the relationship of anger to justice and the creative self. In their poetry and prose, Romantic authors including Blake, Coleridge, Godwin, Shelley and Byron negotiate the meanings of indignation and rage amidst a clamourous debate over the place of anger in art and in civil society. This innovative book has much to contribute to the understanding of Romantic literature and the cultural history of the emotions.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR590 .S74 2005eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=237561 Available EBL237561

Cover -- Half-title -- Series-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviations -- Introduction: fits of rage -- CHAPTER 1 Towards Romantic anger -- CHAPTER 2 Burke, Coleridge, and the rage for indignation -- CHAPTER 3 Inflammatory reactions -- CHAPTER 4 Provocation and the plot of anger -- CHAPTER 5 Shelley and the masks of anger -- CHAPTER 6 Byron's curse -- Epilogue -- Notes -- INTRODUCTION : FITS OF RAGE -- 1 TOWARDS ROMANTIC ANGER -- 2 BURKE, COLERIDGE, AND THE RAGE FOR INDIGNATION -- 3 INFLAMMATORY REACTIONS -- 4 PROVOCATION AND THE PLOT OF ANGER

5 SHELLEY AND THE MASKS OF ANGER -- 6 BYRON'S CURSE -- EPILOGUE -- Bibliography -- Index

The Romantic age was one of anger and its consequences: revolution and reaction, terror and war. Andrew M. Stauffer explores the changing place of anger in the literature and culture of the period, as English men and women rethought their relationship to the aggressive passions in the wake of the French Revolution. Drawing on diverse fields and discourses such as aesthetics, politics, medicine and the law and tracing the classical legacy the Romantics inherited, Stauffer charts the period's struggle to define the relationship of anger to justice and the creative self. In their poetry and prose, Romantic authors including Blake, Coleridge, Godwin, Shelley and Byron negotiate the meanings of indignation and rage amidst a clamourous debate over the place of anger in art and in civil society. This innovative book has much to contribute to the understanding of Romantic literature and the cultural history of the emotions.

Description based upon print version of record.

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