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Their Fathers'' Daughters : Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, and Patriarchal Complicity

By: Kowaleski-Wallace, Elizabeth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1991Description: 1 online resource (250 p.).ISBN: 9781602566125.Subject(s): English fiction | English fiction - 18th century - History and criticism | Fathers and daughters in literature | More, Hannah | Patriarchy in literature | Women and literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Their Fathers'' Daughters : Hannah More, Maria Edgeworth, and Patriarchal ComplicityDDC classification: 823/.5099287 LOC classification: PR858.W6 K68 1991ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; 1 Their Fathers'' Daughters: An Introduction; 2 Milton''s Bogey Reconsidered; 3 Hannah and Her Sister: Women and Evangelicalism; An Introduction to Maria Edgeworth; 4 Home Economics: Domestic Ideology in Belinda; 5 Good Housekeeping: The Politics of Anglo-Irish Ascendancy; 6 Monstrous Daughters: The Problem of Maternal Inheritance; 7 Coda: Charlotte Bronte and Milton''s Cook; NOTES; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; W; Y
Summary: Current feminist theory has developed powerful explanations for some women writers'' rebellion against patriarchy. But other women writers did not rebel; rather, they supported and celebrated patriarchy. Examining the lives and selected works of two late eighteenth-century writers, Hannah More and Maria Edgeworth, this book explores what it means for a woman writer to identify with her father and the patriarchal tradition he represents. Kowaleski-Wallace exposes the psychological, social, and historical factors that motivated such an identification, and reveals the consequences that result from being a "daddy''s girl."
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PR858.W6 K68 1991eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=241572 Available EBL241572

CONTENTS; 1 Their Fathers'' Daughters: An Introduction; 2 Milton''s Bogey Reconsidered; 3 Hannah and Her Sister: Women and Evangelicalism; An Introduction to Maria Edgeworth; 4 Home Economics: Domestic Ideology in Belinda; 5 Good Housekeeping: The Politics of Anglo-Irish Ascendancy; 6 Monstrous Daughters: The Problem of Maternal Inheritance; 7 Coda: Charlotte Bronte and Milton''s Cook; NOTES; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; W; Y

Current feminist theory has developed powerful explanations for some women writers'' rebellion against patriarchy. But other women writers did not rebel; rather, they supported and celebrated patriarchy. Examining the lives and selected works of two late eighteenth-century writers, Hannah More and Maria Edgeworth, this book explores what it means for a woman writer to identify with her father and the patriarchal tradition he represents. Kowaleski-Wallace exposes the psychological, social, and historical factors that motivated such an identification, and reveals the consequences that result from being a "daddy''s girl."

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Kowaleski-Wallace views her work as "a study of patterns of complicity or the motivations behind women's identifications with their fathers, of the forms their complicity can take, and of the consequences of that identification." She examines Hannah More and Marie Edgeworth as daughters who "define themselves in opposition to a representation of nature that is consistently 'other'." More's Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education (London, 1799) and her work with William Wilberforce and Evangelicalism are analyzed in terms of feminist theory. The discussion of Female Education centers around More's attitude to Milton and his daughters, and to his characterization of "mother" Eve. More's "relationship to the Evangelical movement was paradoxical even though it has been widely praised." For Maria Edgeworth there is a chapter on "Domestic Ideology in Belinda" and another on "The Politics of Anglo-Irish Ascendancy." Kowaleski-Wallace cites Lawrence Stone's The Family, Sex and Marriage in England, 1500-1800 (CH, May'78), Marilyn Butler's Romantics, Rebels, and Reactionaries (CH, Jul'82), as well as Kristina Straub's Divided Status: Fanny Burney and Feminine Strategy (CH, Jul'88). In each case she develops her own theme of "patriarchal complicity." The whole argument of this study is cast in feminist theory; there is no documented background of fact and no placing of More and Edgeworth in the larger context of the development of the novel or religious discourse. As such the book is a valuable addition to women's studies collections. Upper-division undergraduates and above.-A. Jenkins, Georgia Institute of Technology

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