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Waking Giants : The Presence of the Past in Modernism

By: Schneidau, Herbert N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1991Description: 1 online resource (294 p.).ISBN: 9781601298126.Subject(s): American literature | English literature | English literature - 20th century - History and criticism | History in literature | Memory in literature | Modernism (Literature)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Waking Giants : The Presence of the Past in ModernismDDC classification: 820.9/00912 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction/The Persistence of Memory: Joyce''s Regress from Mortmain to Atavism; 1. The Century''s Corpse Outleant: Hardy and Modernism; 2. Safe as Houses: Forster as Cambridge Anthropologist; 3. The Primal Scene in The Secret Agent: Sex and Violence in the Nightmare Universe; 4. The Personal Past Recaptured: Anderson & Sons; 5. Ezra Pound: The Archaeology of the Immanent; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: This is a study of the most paradoxical aspect of modernism, its obsession with the past. Eliot wrote that the artist must be conscious "not only of the pastness of the past, but of its presence." This creed permeated the movement: Modernists believed that the energies of the past could be resurrected in modern works, and that they could be the very force that makes those works modern: the urge of Pound and others to "make it new" stemmed from seeing the past as a source of renewal. Schneidau focuses on separate texts that incorporate these concepts: Joyce''s Ulysses, Hardy''s poems, Forster''s Howards End, Conrad''s Secret Agent, Sherwood Anderson''s Winesburg, Ohio, and finally Pound''s Cantos. In his discussions, many little-noticed connections are examined, including a transatlantic set: Hardy with Pound, Forster with Fitzgerald, Joyce and Lawrence with Anderson.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR478.M6 S36 1991eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=241574 Available EBL241574

Contents; Introduction/The Persistence of Memory: Joyce''s Regress from Mortmain to Atavism; 1. The Century''s Corpse Outleant: Hardy and Modernism; 2. Safe as Houses: Forster as Cambridge Anthropologist; 3. The Primal Scene in The Secret Agent: Sex and Violence in the Nightmare Universe; 4. The Personal Past Recaptured: Anderson & Sons; 5. Ezra Pound: The Archaeology of the Immanent; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

This is a study of the most paradoxical aspect of modernism, its obsession with the past. Eliot wrote that the artist must be conscious "not only of the pastness of the past, but of its presence." This creed permeated the movement: Modernists believed that the energies of the past could be resurrected in modern works, and that they could be the very force that makes those works modern: the urge of Pound and others to "make it new" stemmed from seeing the past as a source of renewal. Schneidau focuses on separate texts that incorporate these concepts: Joyce''s Ulysses, Hardy''s poems, Forster''s Howards End, Conrad''s Secret Agent, Sherwood Anderson''s Winesburg, Ohio, and finally Pound''s Cantos. In his discussions, many little-noticed connections are examined, including a transatlantic set: Hardy with Pound, Forster with Fitzgerald, Joyce and Lawrence with Anderson.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Schneidau considers all Modernists to be, in one way or another, atavists, and he explores their paradoxical and varying discomfort with the very notion of the "modern." Although this idea has been well mined previously, the major contribution of Waking Giants is in its insightful readings of individual texts and in its fresh comparisons and studies of influence. Schneidau links Hardy's The Dynasts to Pound's Cantos in aspiring to be "an Iliad of Europe." Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby is seen as "an American piracy" of Forster's Howards End. In perhaps the best chapter, Schneidau posits that Anderson's exploration of the personal past in Winesburg, Ohio may have been motivated by Joyce's "Araby." He goes on to show Anderson as an heir to Lawrence as well. Elsewhere are found thoughtful chapters on Conrad's The Secret Agent and Pound's Cantos. Recommended for graduate students and faculty.-R. D. Newman, Texas A & M University

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