The Future of Southern Letters.

By: Humphries, JeffersonContributor(s): Lowe, JohnMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (209 p.)ISBN: 9781602560567Subject(s): American literature | American literature - Southern States - History and criticism - Theory, etc | Authors, American | Canon (Literature)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Future of Southern LettersDDC classification: 810.9975 LOC classification: PS261 .F88 1996ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Contributors; Introduction; 1. Southern Writing and the Problem of the Father ; 2. Still Southern after All These Years ; 3. Writing on the Cusp: Double Alterity and Minority Discourse in Appalachia ; 4. The Shape of Appalachian Literature to Come: An Interview with Wil Hickson; 5. Porch-Sitting and Southern Poetry; 6. Of Canons and Cultural Wars: Southern Literature and Literary Scholarship after Midcentury; 7. ... And Ladies of the Club; 8. An Interview with Brenda Marie Osbey
9. The Discourse of Southernness: Or How We Can Know There Will Be Such a Thing as the South and Southern Literary Culture in the Twenty-First Century10. Autobiographical Traditions Black and White; 11. Speculations on a Southern Snipe; 12. Robert Olen Butler: A Pulitzer Profile; 13. The Rhetoric of Southern Humor; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z
Summary: The New South--replete with shopping malls, hub airports, educated African Americans, and immigrants from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Haiti--is still haunted by the Gothic ghosts of its past. Does the collision between past and present account for the continued preeminence of Southern writers in America''s literary culture? Bobbie Ann Mason, Ernest Gaines, Rita Mae Brown, Robert Olen Butler, Cormac McCarthy, Dorothy Allison, and Allan Gurganus are just a few of the writers who draw on a new kind of Southern background while reaching out to a broad American readership. Yet many of these writers have been accused of catering to the stereotypes they think a national audience requires. It would seem that questions of Southern identity continue to be bound up with rage against attacks on Southern culture. Jefferson Humphries and John Lowe have assembled a remarkable team of scholars and writers to examine aspects of the contemporary literature of the South. From Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Fred Hobson to esteemed scholar James Olney to poets Kate Daniels and Brenda Marie Osbey, the contributors try to define Southern culture today and ask who will be writing Southern literature tomorrow. Addressing topics such as humor, the past , black autobiography, ethnicity, and female oral traditions, the essays form a volume that is of interest to readers of Southern literature and history, creative writers, and scholars and students of Southern culture.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS261 .F88 1996eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=272937 Available EBL272937

Contents; Contributors; Introduction; 1. Southern Writing and the Problem of the Father ; 2. Still Southern after All These Years ; 3. Writing on the Cusp: Double Alterity and Minority Discourse in Appalachia ; 4. The Shape of Appalachian Literature to Come: An Interview with Wil Hickson; 5. Porch-Sitting and Southern Poetry; 6. Of Canons and Cultural Wars: Southern Literature and Literary Scholarship after Midcentury; 7. ... And Ladies of the Club; 8. An Interview with Brenda Marie Osbey

9. The Discourse of Southernness: Or How We Can Know There Will Be Such a Thing as the South and Southern Literary Culture in the Twenty-First Century10. Autobiographical Traditions Black and White; 11. Speculations on a Southern Snipe; 12. Robert Olen Butler: A Pulitzer Profile; 13. The Rhetoric of Southern Humor; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z

The New South--replete with shopping malls, hub airports, educated African Americans, and immigrants from Vietnam, Cambodia, and Haiti--is still haunted by the Gothic ghosts of its past. Does the collision between past and present account for the continued preeminence of Southern writers in America''s literary culture? Bobbie Ann Mason, Ernest Gaines, Rita Mae Brown, Robert Olen Butler, Cormac McCarthy, Dorothy Allison, and Allan Gurganus are just a few of the writers who draw on a new kind of Southern background while reaching out to a broad American readership. Yet many of these writers have been accused of catering to the stereotypes they think a national audience requires. It would seem that questions of Southern identity continue to be bound up with rage against attacks on Southern culture. Jefferson Humphries and John Lowe have assembled a remarkable team of scholars and writers to examine aspects of the contemporary literature of the South. From Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Fred Hobson to esteemed scholar James Olney to poets Kate Daniels and Brenda Marie Osbey, the contributors try to define Southern culture today and ask who will be writing Southern literature tomorrow. Addressing topics such as humor, the past , black autobiography, ethnicity, and female oral traditions, the essays form a volume that is of interest to readers of Southern literature and history, creative writers, and scholars and students of Southern culture.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In Southern Literary Study: Problems and Possibilities, ed. by Louis D. Rubin and C. Hugh Holman (Ch, Jun'76), Lewis P. Simpson describes the study of southern literature as "a quest opening yet before us," for its contributors, established professors in this field, question the nature of studies thus far and speculate on the future. Humphries, Lowe, and 12 contributors respond to suggestions from this earlier generation as they concentrate on current 20th-century writing and projected writing during the 21st century. Unlike the earlier study, the majority of contributors to this volume are creative writers. Thus, the insight has an immediate and less formal or systematic quality in its emphasis on the geographical rim and interior margins of southern literature: women, African Americans, Appalachian and Louisiana writers; greater emphasis on autobiography and poetry; and a corresponding focus on folklore, humor, and interdisciplinary studies. This is a book of lists--writers and writings--mapping territories recently established or long overlooked. Like a son both resenting and acknowledging his father, the book looks forward and backward. Essays by Fred Hopson and James Olney and interviews with Brenda Osbey and Robert Olen Butler give this volume particular merit. Highly recommended for all academic libraries. T. Bonner Jr. Xavier University of Louisiana

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.