Social Figures : George Eliot, Social History, and Literary Representation

By: Cottom, DanielContributor(s): Eagleton, TerryMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandTheory and History of Literature: Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 1987Description: 1 online resource (270 p.)ISBN: 9780816682508Subject(s): Eliot, George | Literature and society | Social history in literature | Social problems in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Social Figures : George Eliot, Social History, and Literary RepresentationDDC classification: 823/.8 LOC classification: PR4692.S58C68 1987Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. "George Eliot" and the Fables of the Liberal Intellectual; 2. Education and the Transfigurations of Realism; 3. Literary Consciousness and the Vacancy of the Individual; 4. Genteel Image and Democratic Example; 5. Imperfection and Compensation; 6. Realism and Romance; 7. The Supervision of Art and the Culture of the Sickroom; 8. Private Fragments and Public Monuments; 9. Domesticity and Teratology; Conclusion: Reproduction/Quotation/Criticism; Notes; Index
Summary: Centers on the discourse of the liberal intellectual as exempli?ed in the novels of George Eliot, whose awareness of her aesthetic and social task was keener than that of most Victorian writers.
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PR4692.S58C68 1987 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=310184 Available EBL310184

Contents; Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1. "George Eliot" and the Fables of the Liberal Intellectual; 2. Education and the Transfigurations of Realism; 3. Literary Consciousness and the Vacancy of the Individual; 4. Genteel Image and Democratic Example; 5. Imperfection and Compensation; 6. Realism and Romance; 7. The Supervision of Art and the Culture of the Sickroom; 8. Private Fragments and Public Monuments; 9. Domesticity and Teratology; Conclusion: Reproduction/Quotation/Criticism; Notes; Index

Centers on the discourse of the liberal intellectual as exempli?ed in the novels of George Eliot, whose awareness of her aesthetic and social task was keener than that of most Victorian writers.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

The George Eliot constructed in this work is an eminent Victorian liberal intellectual and skillful propagandist who, in her novels, simultaneously presented and created a bourgeois ideology that remains politically powerful today. Important concepts in the novels are analyzed and related to that ideology, such as the ``gentleman,'' ``realism'' (versus ``romance''), ``ordinary human life,'' ``sympathy,'' the place of education, and the roles of the liberal humanitarian as supervisor and of the liberal intellectual as writer. Occasional references to Eliot's fiction and letters and to other writers and historical events are used to support these analyses. Cottom acknowledges that there are other Eliots besides the one he studies, a ``figure of patriarchy.'' The author, who has previously written The Civilized Imagination: A Study of Ann Radcliffe, Jane Austen, and Sir Walter Scott (1985), here writes in a style often difficult and dull, his tone earnest. This work is related to those of Terry Eagleton (e.g., Criticism and Ideology: A Study in Marxist Literary Theory, CH, Jul '77)-who, in fact, provides a foreword to it-and to Eliot criticism, such as Felicia Bonaparte's Will and Destiny (CH, Sep '75). Appropriate for graduate students and upper-division undergraduates.-K.A. Robb, Bowling Green State University

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