Ghosts of Slavery : A Literary Archaeology of Black Women's Lives

By: Sharpe, JennyMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2003Description: 1 online resource (216 p.)ISBN: 9780816692385Subject(s): Slave insurrections | Slavery in literature | Slaves'' writings | Stedman, John Gabriel | West Indian literature (English) | Women and literature | Women slaves | Women, Black | Women, Black, in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ghosts of Slavery : A Literary Archaeology of Black Women’s LivesDDC classification: 810.9/353 | 810.9353 LOC classification: PR9210.O5S47 2003Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents ; Acknowledgments; Introduction: The Haunting of History; 1. "The Rebels Old Obeah Woman": History as Spirit Possession; 2. "An Incomparable Nurse": The Obi of Domesticity; 3. "Our History Was Truly Broken": Writing Back to a Slave Past; 4. "A Very Troublesome Woman": Who Speaks for the Morality of Slave Women?; Afterword; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: While some scholars imply that only the struggle for freedom was legitimate, Jenny Sharpe complicates the linear narrative-from slavery to freedom and literacy-that emerged from the privileging of autobiographical accounts like that of Frederick Douglass. She challenges a paradigm that equates agency with resistance and self-determination, and introduces new ways to examine negotiations for power within the constraints of slavery.
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PR9210.O5S47 2003 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=310607 Available EBL310607

Contents ; Acknowledgments; Introduction: The Haunting of History; 1. "The Rebels Old Obeah Woman": History as Spirit Possession; 2. "An Incomparable Nurse": The Obi of Domesticity; 3. "Our History Was Truly Broken": Writing Back to a Slave Past; 4. "A Very Troublesome Woman": Who Speaks for the Morality of Slave Women?; Afterword; Notes; Bibliography; Index

While some scholars imply that only the struggle for freedom was legitimate, Jenny Sharpe complicates the linear narrative-from slavery to freedom and literacy-that emerged from the privileging of autobiographical accounts like that of Frederick Douglass. She challenges a paradigm that equates agency with resistance and self-determination, and introduces new ways to examine negotiations for power within the constraints of slavery.

Description based upon print version of record.

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