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Signs and Cities : Black Literary Postmodernism

By: Dubey, Madhu.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2007Description: 1 online resource (295 p.).ISBN: 9780226167282.Subject(s): African Americans | African Americans in literature | American literature - 20th century - History and criticism | American literature - African American authors - History and criticism | American literature | City and town life in literature | Postmodernism (Literature) | Postmodernism (Literature) - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Signs and Cities : Black Literary PostmodernismDDC classification: 810.9/113/08996073 | 810.911308996073 LOC classification: PS153PS153.N5 DPS153.N5D83 2003Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Postmodern Moment in Black Literary and Cultural Studies; 2. Books of Life: Postmodern Uses of Print Literacy; 3. Urban Writing as Voyeurism: Literature in the Age of Spectacle; 4. Reading as Listening: The Southern Folk Aesthetic; 5. Reading as Mediation: Urbanity in the Age of Information; Afterword; Notes; Index
Summary: Signs and Cities is the first book to consider what it means to speak of a postmodern moment in African-American literature. Dubey argues that for African-American studies, postmodernity best names a period, beginning in the early 1970s, marked by acute disenchantment with the promises of urban modernity and of print literacy. Dubey shows how black novelists from the last three decades have reconsidered the modern urban legacy and thus articulated a distinctly African-American strain of postmodernism. She argues that novelists such as Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Ishmael Reed, Sapphire, and John Edgar Wideman probe the disillusionment of urban modernity through repeated recourse to tropes of the book and scenes of reading and writing. Ultimately, she demonstrates that these writers view the book with profound ambivalence, construing it as an urban medium that cannot recapture the face-to-face communities assumed by oral and folk forms of expression.
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PS153 | PS153.N5 D | PS153.N5D83 2003 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=408462 Available EBL408462
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PS153 | PS153.M4 C7 1991 Criticism in the Borderlands PS153 | PS153.M4 Q56 1996 | PS153.M4Q5 | PS153.M4Q56 1996 Home Girls : PS153 | PS153.M4.B69 2002 Extinct Lands, Temporal Geographies PS153 | PS153.N5 D | PS153.N5D83 2003 Signs and Cities : PS153 | PS153.N5 D85 2012 | PS153.N5D85 2012 Black Regions of the Imagination : PS153 | PS153.N5 H64 2014 Legal Fictions : PS153 | PS153.N5C665 2010 African American Writers and Classical Tradition.

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Postmodern Moment in Black Literary and Cultural Studies; 2. Books of Life: Postmodern Uses of Print Literacy; 3. Urban Writing as Voyeurism: Literature in the Age of Spectacle; 4. Reading as Listening: The Southern Folk Aesthetic; 5. Reading as Mediation: Urbanity in the Age of Information; Afterword; Notes; Index

Signs and Cities is the first book to consider what it means to speak of a postmodern moment in African-American literature. Dubey argues that for African-American studies, postmodernity best names a period, beginning in the early 1970s, marked by acute disenchantment with the promises of urban modernity and of print literacy. Dubey shows how black novelists from the last three decades have reconsidered the modern urban legacy and thus articulated a distinctly African-American strain of postmodernism. She argues that novelists such as Octavia Butler, Samuel Delany, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Ishmael Reed, Sapphire, and John Edgar Wideman probe the disillusionment of urban modernity through repeated recourse to tropes of the book and scenes of reading and writing. Ultimately, she demonstrates that these writers view the book with profound ambivalence, construing it as an urban medium that cannot recapture the face-to-face communities assumed by oral and folk forms of expression.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Dubey (Brown Univ.) addresses the gap between theories of postmodern urbanism and the discourse of African American literary and cultural studies. She does so by presenting a historicized assessment of racial representation and knowable community in contemporary African American fiction. The author discusses how readings of race have romanticized racial otherness while avoiding the mediating work necessary for effective cultural criticism. Her own emphasis on mediation in readings of novels by Butler, Sapphire, Reed, Wideman, Morrison, Naylor, and Delaney moves those works into a historical context that counters aesthetic solipsism. For Dubey, the notion of the real cannot be located in technological fetishism that obfuscates referentiality. Only by navigating questions of literary value within the fragmented spaces and shifting lines of power within urban cultures can one speak of a postmodern moment in African American studies. An intelligent extension of work done by hooks and West on African American community, Signs and Cities also offers a critical rereading of Harvey's and Jameson's macrotheories of the postmodern around issues of race and urbanity. The questions Dubey explores are pivotal, and her answers should provide a benchmark for future considerations of race and authenticity. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. R. D. Newman University of Utah

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Madhu Dubey is a professor of English and Afro-American Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is the author of Black Women Novelists and the Nationalist Aesthetic .

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