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Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds.

By: Hardwick, Lorna.
Contributor(s): Gillespie, Carol.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Classical Presences: Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, UK, 2007Description: 1 online resource (439 p.).ISBN: 9780191537844.Subject(s): African drama (English) | Caribbean literature (English) | Classicism in literature | Commonwealth literature (English) | Influence (Literary, artistic, etc.) | Literature, Comparative | PostcolonialismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Classics in Post-Colonial WorldsDDC classification: 809 | 820.9/9171241 LOC classification: PR9080.5.C6 2007Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Contributors; Introduction; PART I: CASE STUDIES; PART II: ENCOUNTER AND NEW TRADITIONS; PART III: CHALLENGING THEORY: FRAMING FURTHER QUESTIONS; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Classical material was traditionally used to express colonial authority, but it was also appropriated by imperial subjects and put to new uses. In this collection of essays, international scholars debate the relationship between the culture of Greece and Rome and the changes that have followed the end of colonial empires. - ;Classical material was traditionally used to express colonial authority, but it was also appropriated by imperial subjects to become first a means of challenging colonialism and then a rich field for creating cultural identities that blend the old and the new. Nobel prize-winners such as Derek Walcott and Seamus Heaney have rewritten classical material in their own cultural idioms while public sculpture in southern Africa draws on Greek and Roman motifs to represent histories of. African resistance and liberation. These developments are explored in this collection of essays by international scholars, who debate the relationship between the culture of Greece and Rome and the changes that have followed the end of colonial empires. -
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR9080.5.C6 2007 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=415166 Available EBL415166

Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Contributors; Introduction; PART I: CASE STUDIES; PART II: ENCOUNTER AND NEW TRADITIONS; PART III: CHALLENGING THEORY: FRAMING FURTHER QUESTIONS; Bibliography; Index

Classical material was traditionally used to express colonial authority, but it was also appropriated by imperial subjects and put to new uses. In this collection of essays, international scholars debate the relationship between the culture of Greece and Rome and the changes that have followed the end of colonial empires. - ;Classical material was traditionally used to express colonial authority, but it was also appropriated by imperial subjects to become first a means of challenging colonialism and then a rich field for creating cultural identities that blend the old and the new. Nobel prize-winners such as Derek Walcott and Seamus Heaney have rewritten classical material in their own cultural idioms while public sculpture in southern Africa draws on Greek and Roman motifs to represent histories of. African resistance and liberation. These developments are explored in this collection of essays by international scholars, who debate the relationship between the culture of Greece and Rome and the changes that have followed the end of colonial empires. -

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lorna Hardwick is Professor of Classical Studies and Director of the Reception of Classical Texts and Images Research Project at The Open University.Carol Gillespie is Project Officer of the Reception of Classical Texts and Images Research Project at The Open University.

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