Cretan Women : Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra in Latin Poetry

By: Armstrong, RebeccaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandOxford Classical Monographs: Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, UK, 2006Description: 1 online resource (362 p.)ISBN: 9780191515811Subject(s): Ariadne (Greek mythology) | Latin poetry | Mythology, Greek, in literature | Pasiphae (Greek mythology) | Phaedra (Greek mythology) | Women and literature | Women in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Cretan Women : Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra in Latin PoetryDDC classification: 871/.0109351 LOC classification: PA6030.W7A76 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Abbreviations; Introduction; Part One: Themes; 1. Ethics and Poetics: Literary and Personal Memory in Representations of Cretan Women; 2. The Call of the Wild; 3. Vice and Virtue; Part Two: Texts; 4. Pasiphae in the Eclogues and Ars Amatoria; 5. Ariadne in Catullus 64; 6. Ariadne and Ovid; 7. Phaedra from Elegiac Lover to Stoic Anti-Exemplum? Heroides 4 and Seneca, Phaedra; Conclusion; Appendices; 1. Crete in History: Perpetuating the Stereotypes?; 2. The Catasterism of Ariadne's Crown and the Memory of Love; Bibliography; Index of Passages; General Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I
JK; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; V; W; Z
Summary: Rebecca Armstrong investigates the myths of three Cretan women - King Minos'' wife, Pasiphae, and their daughters Ariadne and Phaedra - as they appear in Latin poetry of the late Republic and early Empire. She offers detailed readings of the most prominent treatments of the stories, alongside a thematic investigation of the ideas of memory, wildness, and morality which recur so prominently in the tales. - ;In this detailed study of the representations of Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra in Latin poetry, Rebecca Armstrong investigates both the literary history of the myths (the Greek roots, the interactions between Roman versions) and their cultural resonance. In addition to close readings of the major treatments of each woman''s story (in Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, and Seneca), she offers extended thematic explorations of the importance of memory, wildness, and morality in the myths. By. extending the net to encompass three women (all from the same ill-fated family), the book gives a clear picture of the complexity and fascinating interconnectedness of myths and texts in Ancient Rome. - ;''a stimulating read...'' - Laurel Fulkerson, Classical World 20/05/08
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Contents; Abbreviations; Introduction; Part One: Themes; 1. Ethics and Poetics: Literary and Personal Memory in Representations of Cretan Women; 2. The Call of the Wild; 3. Vice and Virtue; Part Two: Texts; 4. Pasiphae in the Eclogues and Ars Amatoria; 5. Ariadne in Catullus 64; 6. Ariadne and Ovid; 7. Phaedra from Elegiac Lover to Stoic Anti-Exemplum? Heroides 4 and Seneca, Phaedra; Conclusion; Appendices; 1. Crete in History: Perpetuating the Stereotypes?; 2. The Catasterism of Ariadne's Crown and the Memory of Love; Bibliography; Index of Passages; General Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I

JK; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; V; W; Z

Rebecca Armstrong investigates the myths of three Cretan women - King Minos'' wife, Pasiphae, and their daughters Ariadne and Phaedra - as they appear in Latin poetry of the late Republic and early Empire. She offers detailed readings of the most prominent treatments of the stories, alongside a thematic investigation of the ideas of memory, wildness, and morality which recur so prominently in the tales. - ;In this detailed study of the representations of Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra in Latin poetry, Rebecca Armstrong investigates both the literary history of the myths (the Greek roots, the interactions between Roman versions) and their cultural resonance. In addition to close readings of the major treatments of each woman''s story (in Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, and Seneca), she offers extended thematic explorations of the importance of memory, wildness, and morality in the myths. By. extending the net to encompass three women (all from the same ill-fated family), the book gives a clear picture of the complexity and fascinating interconnectedness of myths and texts in Ancient Rome. - ;''a stimulating read...'' - Laurel Fulkerson, Classical World 20/05/08

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Rebecca Armstrong is Fellow and Tutor in Classics, St Hilda's College, and Department of Classics, Oxford University.

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