Dialect and Dichotomy : Literary Representations of African American Speech

By: Minnick, Lisa CohenMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (217 p.)ISBN: 9780817380151Subject(s): African Americans -- Intellectual life | American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticism | English language -- Spoken English -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Dialect and Dichotomy : Literary Representations of African American SpeechDDC classification: 810.9/975 | 810.9896073 | 810.9975 LOC classification: PL8010PS153PS153.N5M56 2004Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Tables; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. A Brief History of American Literary Dialect; 2 . Linguists, Literary Critics, and Literary Dialect; 3. Methodology; 4. Articulating Jim: Language and Characterization in Huckleberry Finn; 5. "A High, Holy Purpose": Dialect in Charles W. Chesnutt's Conjure Tales; 6. Representations of Speech and Attitudes about Race in The Sound and the Fury; 7. Community in Conflict: Saying and Doing in Their Eyes Were Watching God; 8. Conclusions; Appendix A: Phonological Data for Jim in Huckleberry Finn
Appendix B: Speaker Data from The Sound and the FuryAppendix C: Speaker Data from Their Eyes Were Watching God; Notes; Works Cited; Index
Summary: Applies linguistics methods for a richer understanding of literary texts and spoken language. Dialect and Dichotomy outlines the history of dialect writing in English and its influence on linguistic variation. It also surveys American dialect writing and its relationship to literary, linguistic, political, and cultural trends, with emphasis on African American voices in literature. Furthermore, this book introduces and critiques canonical works in literary dialect analysis and covers recent, innovative applications of linguistic analysis of literature. Next, it proposes theoretical principles and specific methods that can be implemented in order to analyze literary dialect for either linguistic or literary purposes, or both. Finally, the proposed methods are applied in four original analyses of African American speech as represented in major works of fiction of the American South-Mark Twain''s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Charles W. Chesnutt''s The Conjure Woman, William Faulkner''s The Sound and the Fury, and Zora Neale Hurston''s Their Eyes Were Watching God. Dialect and Dichotomy is designed to be accessible to audiences with a variety of linguistic and literary backgrounds. It is an ideal research resource and course text for students and scholars interested in areas including American, African American, and southern literature and culture; linguistic applications to literature; language in the African American community; ethnicity and representation; literary dialect analysis and/or computational linguistics; dialect writing as genre; and American English.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PL8010 | PS153 | PS153.N5M56 2004 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=454573 Available EBL454573

Contents; Tables; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. A Brief History of American Literary Dialect; 2 . Linguists, Literary Critics, and Literary Dialect; 3. Methodology; 4. Articulating Jim: Language and Characterization in Huckleberry Finn; 5. "A High, Holy Purpose": Dialect in Charles W. Chesnutt's Conjure Tales; 6. Representations of Speech and Attitudes about Race in The Sound and the Fury; 7. Community in Conflict: Saying and Doing in Their Eyes Were Watching God; 8. Conclusions; Appendix A: Phonological Data for Jim in Huckleberry Finn

Appendix B: Speaker Data from The Sound and the FuryAppendix C: Speaker Data from Their Eyes Were Watching God; Notes; Works Cited; Index

Applies linguistics methods for a richer understanding of literary texts and spoken language. Dialect and Dichotomy outlines the history of dialect writing in English and its influence on linguistic variation. It also surveys American dialect writing and its relationship to literary, linguistic, political, and cultural trends, with emphasis on African American voices in literature. Furthermore, this book introduces and critiques canonical works in literary dialect analysis and covers recent, innovative applications of linguistic analysis of literature. Next, it proposes theoretical principles and specific methods that can be implemented in order to analyze literary dialect for either linguistic or literary purposes, or both. Finally, the proposed methods are applied in four original analyses of African American speech as represented in major works of fiction of the American South-Mark Twain''s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Charles W. Chesnutt''s The Conjure Woman, William Faulkner''s The Sound and the Fury, and Zora Neale Hurston''s Their Eyes Were Watching God. Dialect and Dichotomy is designed to be accessible to audiences with a variety of linguistic and literary backgrounds. It is an ideal research resource and course text for students and scholars interested in areas including American, African American, and southern literature and culture; linguistic applications to literature; language in the African American community; ethnicity and representation; literary dialect analysis and/or computational linguistics; dialect writing as genre; and American English.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Minnick (Western Michigan Univ.) considers the social and political implications of African American English as depicted in four literary works: Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Charles W. Chesnutt's The Conjure Woman, and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. The author's wise choice to view her topic through the work of two Caucasians and two African Americans gives the study a desirable and necessary balance. Shelley Fisher Fishkin broached the dialect question in her outstanding Was Huck Black? Mark Twain and African American Voices (CH, Sep'93), but the single-author focus denied that volume, however compelling, the valuable contrasts that inform the present study. Minnick notes that Caucasian authors have employed African American English to make their writing realistic and, as in Faulkner, to arrive at "subtle interpretations of the racial attitudes of his characters." But she acknowledges that African American writers face the question of whether "the desire to represent black experiences authentically competes both with the demands of the market and with trends within the political and literary movements of African American thinkers and artists." This is an important and highly original study. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. B. Shuman emeritus, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Lisa Cohen Minnick is Assistant Professor of English at Western Michigan University. She has contributed to the African American and Gullah data digitization project for the Linguistic Atlas of the Middle and South Atlantic States at the University of Georgia.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.