Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Metaphors Dead and Alive, Sleeping and Waking : A Dynamic View

By: Müller, Cornelia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (293 p.).ISBN: 9780226548265.Subject(s): Art and literature | Metaphor -- Congresses | Performing arts in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Metaphors Dead and Alive, Sleeping and Waking : A Dynamic ViewDDC classification: 808 LOC classification: PN228PN228.M4M87 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Typographical Conventions for Transcripts; Introduction; 1. Metaphors and Cognitive Activity: A Dynamic View; 2. Metaphors in Thought and Language: Fundamental Issues; 3. Realms of Metaphors: Activation in Language Use; 4. The Core of Metaphors: The Establishment of a Triadic Structure; 5. Mixed Metaphors: Selective Activation of Meaning; 6. Sleeping and Waking Metaphors: Degrees of Metaphoricity; 7. The Refutation of the Dead versus Alive Distinction: A New Approach and Some of Its Implications; Lieb's Sources; Appendix; Notes; References
Name IndexSubject Index
Summary: Traditional thinking on metaphors has divided them into two camps: dead and alive. Conventional expressions from everyday language are classified as dead, while much rarer novel or poetic metaphors are alive. In the 1980s, new theories on the cognitive processes involved with the use of metaphor challenged these assumptions, but with little empirical support. Drawing on the latest research in linguistics, semiotics, philosophy, and psychology, Cornelia Müller here unveils a new approach that refutes the rigid dead/alive dichotomy, offering in its place a more dynamic model: sleeping and waking.            To build this model, Müller presents an overview of notions of metaphor from the classical period to the present; studies in detail how metaphors function in speech, text, gesture, and images; and examines the way mixed metaphors sometimes make sense and sometimes do not. This analysis leads her to conclude that metaphors may oscillate between various degrees of sleeping and waking as their status changes depending on context and intention. Bridging the gap between conceptual metaphor theory and more traditional linguistic theories, this book is a major advance for the field and will be vital to novices and initiates alike.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN228 | PN228.M4M87 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=471893 Available EBL471893
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
PN221 | PN221 .C77 2010 The Methodical Memory : PN227.F34 1999 Rhetorical Figures in Science. PN227 .R46 2007 Renaissance Figures of Speech. PN228 | PN228.M4M87 2008 Metaphors Dead and Alive, Sleeping and Waking : PN228.M4 The Lives of Texts : PN228 .M4 Metaphor in Focus : PN228.M4 -- .M483 1995 Metaphor and Philosophy :

Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Typographical Conventions for Transcripts; Introduction; 1. Metaphors and Cognitive Activity: A Dynamic View; 2. Metaphors in Thought and Language: Fundamental Issues; 3. Realms of Metaphors: Activation in Language Use; 4. The Core of Metaphors: The Establishment of a Triadic Structure; 5. Mixed Metaphors: Selective Activation of Meaning; 6. Sleeping and Waking Metaphors: Degrees of Metaphoricity; 7. The Refutation of the Dead versus Alive Distinction: A New Approach and Some of Its Implications; Lieb's Sources; Appendix; Notes; References

Name IndexSubject Index

Traditional thinking on metaphors has divided them into two camps: dead and alive. Conventional expressions from everyday language are classified as dead, while much rarer novel or poetic metaphors are alive. In the 1980s, new theories on the cognitive processes involved with the use of metaphor challenged these assumptions, but with little empirical support. Drawing on the latest research in linguistics, semiotics, philosophy, and psychology, Cornelia Müller here unveils a new approach that refutes the rigid dead/alive dichotomy, offering in its place a more dynamic model: sleeping and waking.            To build this model, Müller presents an overview of notions of metaphor from the classical period to the present; studies in detail how metaphors function in speech, text, gesture, and images; and examines the way mixed metaphors sometimes make sense and sometimes do not. This analysis leads her to conclude that metaphors may oscillate between various degrees of sleeping and waking as their status changes depending on context and intention. Bridging the gap between conceptual metaphor theory and more traditional linguistic theories, this book is a major advance for the field and will be vital to novices and initiates alike.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In looking at the theory of metaphor, Muller (applied linguistics, European Universitat Viadrina, Frankfurt) makes four assumptions: metaphors are cognitively active; they depend on use; their meaning has a triadic structure; and they are "modality independent," i.e., not just verbal. Muller claims that many of what are called dead metaphors are cognitively active, so she proposes, as the title implies, replacing the living/dead distinction with sleeping/waking. But the book covers much more than the living/dead distinction. The author contrasts a conceptual theory of metaphor with a purely linguistic one and offers not just verbal metaphors but also data from gesturing and from popular culture and commercial images to support a conceptual model. She explains mixed metaphors in terms of her approach and expands on the triadic structure of metaphors. Though this study is abstract and philosophical, M^D"ller's well-organized discussion and contextualized and empirical data make the book readable and accessible. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. C. L. Thompson Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.