Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Infidel Poetics : Riddles, Nightlife, Substance

By: Tiffany, Daniel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (266 p.).ISBN: 9780226803111.Subject(s): Cant | Cant | Poetry - History and criticism | Poetry -- History and criticism | Poetry - Social aspects | Poetry -- Social aspects | Riddles in literature | Riddles in literature | Slang | SlangGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Infidel Poetics : Riddles, Nightlife, SubstanceDDC classification: 809 | 809.1 | 809.93355 | 809/.93355 LOC classification: PN1126PN1126 .T54 2009PN1126.T54 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction: Lyric Substance and Social Being; 1. The Spectacle of Obscurity; 2. Riddlecraft; 3. Lost Laboratories of the Sphinx; 4. Lyric Monadologies; 5. Infidel Lyric: The Rhymes of the Canting Crew; 6. Flash Crib: A Genealogy of Modern Nightlife; 7. Mother Goose and Mallarmé; Afterword: Social Inversion, Kitsch, and the Art of Disappearing; Index
Summary: Poetry has long been regarded as the least accessible of literary genres. But how much does the obscurity that confounds readers of a poem differ from, say, the slang that seduces listeners of hip-hop?  Infidel Poetics examines not only the shared incomprensibilities of poetry and slang, but poetry''s genetic relation to the spectacle of underground culture.Charting connections between vernacular poetry, lyric obscurity, and types of social relations-networks of darkened streets in preindustrial cities, the historical underworld of taverns and clubs, the subcultures of the avant-garde-Daniel Tiffany shows that obscurity in poetry has functioned for hundreds of years as a medium of alternative societies.  For example, he discovers in the submerged tradition of canting poetry and its eccentric genres-thieves' carols, drinking songs, beggars' chants-a genealogy of modern nightlife, but also a visible underworld of social and verbal substance, a demimonde for sale.Ranging from Anglo-Saxon riddles to Emily Dickinson, from the icy logos of Parmenides to the monadology of Leibniz, from Mother Goose to Mallarmé, Infidel Poetics offers an exhilarating account of the subversive power of obscurity in word, substance, and deed.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1126 | PN1126 .T54 2009 | PN1126.T54 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=471911 Available EBL471911

Contents; Introduction: Lyric Substance and Social Being; 1. The Spectacle of Obscurity; 2. Riddlecraft; 3. Lost Laboratories of the Sphinx; 4. Lyric Monadologies; 5. Infidel Lyric: The Rhymes of the Canting Crew; 6. Flash Crib: A Genealogy of Modern Nightlife; 7. Mother Goose and Mallarmé; Afterword: Social Inversion, Kitsch, and the Art of Disappearing; Index

Poetry has long been regarded as the least accessible of literary genres. But how much does the obscurity that confounds readers of a poem differ from, say, the slang that seduces listeners of hip-hop?  Infidel Poetics examines not only the shared incomprensibilities of poetry and slang, but poetry''s genetic relation to the spectacle of underground culture.Charting connections between vernacular poetry, lyric obscurity, and types of social relations-networks of darkened streets in preindustrial cities, the historical underworld of taverns and clubs, the subcultures of the avant-garde-Daniel Tiffany shows that obscurity in poetry has functioned for hundreds of years as a medium of alternative societies.  For example, he discovers in the submerged tradition of canting poetry and its eccentric genres-thieves' carols, drinking songs, beggars' chants-a genealogy of modern nightlife, but also a visible underworld of social and verbal substance, a demimonde for sale.Ranging from Anglo-Saxon riddles to Emily Dickinson, from the icy logos of Parmenides to the monadology of Leibniz, from Mother Goose to Mallarmé, Infidel Poetics offers an exhilarating account of the subversive power of obscurity in word, substance, and deed.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With this book, Tiffany provides an intriguing addition to a long line of theoretical works that attempt to define the nature of poetry's obscurity, whether located in the text (as discussed, for example, by William Empson in Seven Types of Ambiguity, 1930) or in the perception of the reader (treated by Craig Dworkin in Reading the Illegible, 2003). Unlike its predecessors, however, this book situates poetic obscurity within a larger social context of linguistic obscurity that cuts across genres, cultures, and subcultures--from vernacular cant, riddles, nursery rhymes, and songs written in dialect, slang, or jargon to the lyric poetry more often assumed to be the dominant literary tradition. Tiffany's basic argument is that lyric obscurity, however instantiated, is a social construction and that apparently discontinuous forms of it share common roots. Through an examination of the connections he draws among poetic language, metaphysics, and what he calls "negative sociability," the author concludes that obscurity has the deliberate sociological function of ensuring marginality and anonymity as a form of social and political resistance. Tiffany aims this book at a philosophically and theoretically sophisticated audience. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. A. E. McKim St. Thomas University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Daniel Tiffany is the author of five books of poetry and literary criticism, including Toy Medium: Materialism and Modern Lyric (named one of the "Best Books of 2000" by the Los Angeles Times) and the forthcoming Dandelion Clock . In addition, he has published<br> translations of works from French, Greek, and Italian. His poems have appeared in Tin House , Boston Review, and the Paris Review, and his critical essays on poetry and poetics have been published in Critical Inquiry, PMLA, and Modernism/Modernity. He has held residencies at the MacDowell Colony and the Karolyi Foundation in France and been the recipient of a Whiting Fellowship. He teaches at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. <br> </p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.