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Sitting in Darkness : New South Fiction, Education, and the Rise of Jim Crow Colonialism, 1865-1920

By: Schmidt, Peter.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2008Description: 1 online resource (272 p.).ISBN: 9781604733112.Subject(s): African Americans in literature | American fiction --Southern States --History and criticism | Citizenship in literature | Education in literature | Imperialism in literature | Literature and history --United States --History --19th century | Literature and history --United States --History --20th century | Race relations in literature | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) in literature | Southern States --In literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sitting in Darkness : New South Fiction, Education, and the Rise of Jim Crow Colonialism, 1865-1920DDC classification: 813/.409896073075 LOC classification: PS261.S34 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; PART I. Black Education in Fiction from Reconstruction to Jim Crow: Discovering a Liberal Arts Model for Citizen-Building in a Multiracial Democracy; PART II. Jim Crow Colonialism's Dependency Model for "Uplift": Promotion and Reaction; PART III. The Dark Archive: Early Twentieth-Century Critiques of Jim Crow Colonialism by New South Novelists; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index
Summary: Sitting in Darkness explores how fiction of the Reconstruction and the New South intervenes in debates over black schools, citizen-building, Jim Crow discrimination, and U.S. foreign policy towards its territories and dependencies. The author urges a reexamination not only of the contents and formal innovations of New South literature but also its importance in U.S. literary history. Many rarely studied fiction authors (such as Ellwood Griest, Ellen Ingraham, George Marion McClellan, and Walter Hines Page) receive generous attention here, and well-known figures such as Albion Tourg--and--eacute;e, Frances E. W. Harper, Sutton Griggs, George Washington Cable, Mark Twain, Thomas Dixon, Owen Wister, and W. E. B. Du Bois are illuminated in significant new ways. The book\''s readings seek to synthesize developments in literary and cultural studies, ranging through New Criticism, New Historicism, postcolonial studies, black studies, and \"whiteness\" studies. This volume posits and answers significant questions. In what ways did the \"uplift\" projects of Reconstruction-their ideals and their contradictions-affect U.S. colonial policies in the new territories after 1898? How can fiction that treated these historical changes help us understand them? What relevance does this period have for us in the present, during a moment of great literary innovation and strong debate over how well the most powerful country in the world uses its resources?. Peter Schmidt is professor of English at Swarthmore College. He is the author of William Carlos Williams, the Arts, and Literary Tradition and is the editor (with Amritjit Singh) of Postcolonial Theory and the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Literature (University Press of Mississippi).
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PS261.S34 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=515649 Available EBL515649

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; PART I. Black Education in Fiction from Reconstruction to Jim Crow: Discovering a Liberal Arts Model for Citizen-Building in a Multiracial Democracy; PART II. Jim Crow Colonialism's Dependency Model for "Uplift": Promotion and Reaction; PART III. The Dark Archive: Early Twentieth-Century Critiques of Jim Crow Colonialism by New South Novelists; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index

Sitting in Darkness explores how fiction of the Reconstruction and the New South intervenes in debates over black schools, citizen-building, Jim Crow discrimination, and U.S. foreign policy towards its territories and dependencies. The author urges a reexamination not only of the contents and formal innovations of New South literature but also its importance in U.S. literary history. Many rarely studied fiction authors (such as Ellwood Griest, Ellen Ingraham, George Marion McClellan, and Walter Hines Page) receive generous attention here, and well-known figures such as Albion Tourg--and--eacute;e, Frances E. W. Harper, Sutton Griggs, George Washington Cable, Mark Twain, Thomas Dixon, Owen Wister, and W. E. B. Du Bois are illuminated in significant new ways. The book\''s readings seek to synthesize developments in literary and cultural studies, ranging through New Criticism, New Historicism, postcolonial studies, black studies, and \"whiteness\" studies. This volume posits and answers significant questions. In what ways did the \"uplift\" projects of Reconstruction-their ideals and their contradictions-affect U.S. colonial policies in the new territories after 1898? How can fiction that treated these historical changes help us understand them? What relevance does this period have for us in the present, during a moment of great literary innovation and strong debate over how well the most powerful country in the world uses its resources?. Peter Schmidt is professor of English at Swarthmore College. He is the author of William Carlos Williams, the Arts, and Literary Tradition and is the editor (with Amritjit Singh) of Postcolonial Theory and the United States: Race, Ethnicity, and Literature (University Press of Mississippi).

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