One Kind of Everything : Poem and Person in Contemporary America

By: Chiasson, DanMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (205 p.)ISBN: 9780226103846Subject(s): American poetry - 20th century - History and criticism | American poetry -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Autobiography in literature | Autobiography in literature | Self in literature | Self in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: One Kind of Everything : Poem and Person in Contemporary AmericaDDC classification: 811.509353 | 811.5409 | 811/.509353 LOC classification: PS323PS323.5 .C485 2010PS323.5.C485 2007Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: "One Kind of Everything"; Reading Objects: Robert Lowell; Elizabeth Bishop on Autobiographical Grounds; Reading Frank Bidart Pragmatically; The Tenses of Frank O'Hara; Forms of Narrative in the Poetry of Louise Gluck; Conclusion: Autobiography and the Language School; Works Cited; Index
Summary: One Kind of Everything elucidates the uses of autobiography and constructions of personhood in American poetry since World War II, with helpful reference to American literature in general since Emerson. Taking on one of the most crucial issues in American poetry of the last fifty years, celebrated poet Dan Chiasson explores what is lost or gained when real-life experiences are made part of the subject matter and source material for poetry. In five extended, scholarly essays-on Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Frank Bidart, Frank O'Hara, and Louise Glück-Chiasson looks specifically to bridge the chasm between formal and experimental poetry in the United States. Regardless of form, Chiasson argues that recent American poetry is most thoughtful when it engages most forcefully with autobiographical material, either in an effort to embrace it or denounce it.
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PS316 .C64 2015 The social lives of poems in nineteenth-century America / PS316 .W45 2010 Poetry and Public Discourse in Nineteenth-Century America. PS323 | PS323.5 .A56 2013 Among Friends PS323 | PS323.5 .C485 2010 | PS323.5.C485 2007 One Kind of Everything : PS323 | PS323.5 .D87 2012 | PS323.5.D87 2012 Purple Passages : PS323.5 The Poetry of Disturbance : PS323.5 The First Book :

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: "One Kind of Everything"; Reading Objects: Robert Lowell; Elizabeth Bishop on Autobiographical Grounds; Reading Frank Bidart Pragmatically; The Tenses of Frank O'Hara; Forms of Narrative in the Poetry of Louise Gluck; Conclusion: Autobiography and the Language School; Works Cited; Index

One Kind of Everything elucidates the uses of autobiography and constructions of personhood in American poetry since World War II, with helpful reference to American literature in general since Emerson. Taking on one of the most crucial issues in American poetry of the last fifty years, celebrated poet Dan Chiasson explores what is lost or gained when real-life experiences are made part of the subject matter and source material for poetry. In five extended, scholarly essays-on Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Frank Bidart, Frank O'Hara, and Louise Glück-Chiasson looks specifically to bridge the chasm between formal and experimental poetry in the United States. Regardless of form, Chiasson argues that recent American poetry is most thoughtful when it engages most forcefully with autobiographical material, either in an effort to embrace it or denounce it.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In keeping with literary criticism's current emphasis on gaining insight from outside the text, Chiasson (Amherst and Wellesley colleges), himself a poet, offers a passionate, learned introduction that recognizes Emerson and Whitman as seminal figures in urging literature toward the self. He then focuses on a few poets whose works display autobiographical elements, principally Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, Frank O'Hara, Louise Gluck, and Frank Bidart. A final chapter deals sensitively with the "language school" of contemporary poetry. Especially original are discussions of Yeats in conjunction with O'Hara; 16th-century poet Wyatt in conjunction with Lowell; and the relationship between poetry as imagined or "figured" art and as reflection of the facts of the artist's life. Other subjects include the divide between "confessional poetry" and experimental poetry and the tensions between purely imaginative creations and role of subjectivity. In demonstrating the prevalence of subjectivity in 20th-century poetry, Chiasson is scrupulous in his attention to detail: footnotes and attributions to recent criticism amplify his developing argument. However, the prose style is academic and unfriendly: phrases such as "constructions of personhood" abound and, in speaking of O'Hara, he writes that "one finds oneself inadvertently parsing [the poet's] normative structures." Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students through faculty. B. Wallenstein emeritus, CUNY City College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dan Chiasson is visiting assistant professor of English at Wellesley College. He is the author of two books of poetry, Natural History and The Afterlife of Objects, the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

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