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Modeling Citizenship : Jewish and Asian American Writing

By: Schlund-Vials, Cathy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (246 p.).ISBN: 9781439903193.Subject(s): American literature - Asian American authors - History and criticism | American literature - Jewish authors - History and criticism | American literature --Asian American authors --History and criticism | American literature --Jewish authors --History and criticism | Asian Americans - Intellectual life | Asian Americans in literature | Asian Americans in literature | Asian Americans --Intellectual life | Jews in literature | Jews in literature | Judaism and literature - United States | Judaism and literature --United States | Judaism in literature | Judaism in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Modeling Citizenship : Jewish and Asian American WritingDDC classification: 810.9/8924 | 810.98924 LOC classification: PS153PS153.J4S35 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface: Modeling Citizenship and Modeled Selfhood; Introduction: Perpetual Foreigners and Model Minorities: Naturalizing Jewish and Asian Americans; 1. "Who May Be Citizens of the United States": Citizenship Models in Edith Maude Eaton and Abraham Cahan; 2. Interrupted Allegiances: Indivisibilityand Transnational Pledges; 3. Utopian and Dystopian Citizenships: Visions and Revisions of the "Promised Land"; 4. Reading and Writing America: Bharati Mukherjee's Jasmine and Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation
5. Demarcating the Nation: Naturalizing Cold War Legacies and War on Terror PoliciesEpilogue: "A Sense of Loss and Anomie": Model Minorities and Twenty-First-Century Citizenship; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Navigating deftly among historical and literary readings, Cathy Schlund-Vials examines the analogous yet divergent experiences of Asian Americans and Jewish Americans in Modeling Citizenship. She investigates how these model minority groups are shaped by the shifting terrain of naturalization law and immigration policy, using the lens of naturalization, not assimilation, to underscore questions of nation-state affiliation and sense of belonging.Modeling Citizenship examines fiction, memoir, and drama to reflect on how the logic of naturalization has operated at discrete moments in the twentieth century. Each chapter focuses on two exemplary literary works. For example, Schlund-Vials shows how Mary Antin''s Jewish-themed play The Promised Land is reworked into a more contemporary Chinese American context in Gish Jen''s Mona in the Promised Land.In her compelling analysis, Schlund-Vials amplifies the structural, cultural, and historical significance of these works and the themes they address.
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PS153 | PS153.H56 R67 2008 Contemporary Latina/o Theater : PS153 | PS153.I52T48 2008 Red Land, Red Power PS153 | PS153.J4R33 2010 Radical Poetics and Secular Jewish Culture. PS153 | PS153.J4S35 2011 Modeling Citizenship : PS153 | PS153.M4 A Xicana Codex of Changing Consciousness PS153 | PS153.M4 .M56 2013 Accessible Citizenships : PS153 | PS153.M4 C7 1991 Criticism in the Borderlands

Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface: Modeling Citizenship and Modeled Selfhood; Introduction: Perpetual Foreigners and Model Minorities: Naturalizing Jewish and Asian Americans; 1. "Who May Be Citizens of the United States": Citizenship Models in Edith Maude Eaton and Abraham Cahan; 2. Interrupted Allegiances: Indivisibilityand Transnational Pledges; 3. Utopian and Dystopian Citizenships: Visions and Revisions of the "Promised Land"; 4. Reading and Writing America: Bharati Mukherjee's Jasmine and Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation

5. Demarcating the Nation: Naturalizing Cold War Legacies and War on Terror PoliciesEpilogue: "A Sense of Loss and Anomie": Model Minorities and Twenty-First-Century Citizenship; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Navigating deftly among historical and literary readings, Cathy Schlund-Vials examines the analogous yet divergent experiences of Asian Americans and Jewish Americans in Modeling Citizenship. She investigates how these model minority groups are shaped by the shifting terrain of naturalization law and immigration policy, using the lens of naturalization, not assimilation, to underscore questions of nation-state affiliation and sense of belonging.Modeling Citizenship examines fiction, memoir, and drama to reflect on how the logic of naturalization has operated at discrete moments in the twentieth century. Each chapter focuses on two exemplary literary works. For example, Schlund-Vials shows how Mary Antin''s Jewish-themed play The Promised Land is reworked into a more contemporary Chinese American context in Gish Jen''s Mona in the Promised Land.In her compelling analysis, Schlund-Vials amplifies the structural, cultural, and historical significance of these works and the themes they address.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This slim, overly ambitious volume analyzes not only the writing promised in its subtitle, but also US immigration policy, film, and political careers. The work's success lies in Schlund-Vials's comparative study of analogous yet divergent texts of Jewish and Asian American literatures regarding "model minorities," migration, relocation, and citizenship, thoughtfully interpreted in terms of law, public sentiment, and immigrant attitudes of belonging and alienation. Schlund-Vials (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs) pairs single texts: Abraham Cahan's Yekl and Edith Maude Eaton's short fiction; Mary Antin's autobiography The Promised Land and Gish Jen's Mona in the Promised Land; Bharati Mukherjee's Jasmine and Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation. Straying from the Jewish American focus, she also looks at British Jewish playwright Israel Zangwill's The Melting Pot alongside Chin Lee's The Flower Drum Song. Whereas the Jewish selections are limited to Russian- and Polish-born writers, the Asian American authors are of more diverse backgrounds--Chinese, Indian, Vietnamese. Less successful are the digressive framing chapters, which depart from the literary focus--the first an astute critical look at a kitsch revival of The Jazz Singer, the other a consideration of career biographies of Vietnamese American law professor Viet Dinh and former Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. S. L. Kremer emerita, Kansas State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Cathy Schlund-Vials is Assistant Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut-Storrs.<br> <br> </p>

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