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Manuscript Verse Collectors and the Politics of Anti-Courtly Love Poetry.

By: Eckhardt, Joshua.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (317 p.).ISBN: 9780191569746.Subject(s): English poetry -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- History and criticism | Love poetry, English -- History and criticism | Manuscripts, English -- Collectors and collecting | Politics and literature -- England -- History -- 17th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Manuscript Verse Collectors and the Politics of Anti-Courtly Love PoetryDDC classification: 821.309 | 821.3093543 LOC classification: PR545.L7 E24 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Abbreviations and Conventions; 1. The Literary and Political Activity of Manuscript Verse Collectors; 2. The Politics of Courtly and Anti-Courtly Love Poetry in the Hands of Collectors; 3. 'Love-song weeds, and Satyrique thornes': Anti-Courtly Love Poetry and Somerset Libels; 4. The Spanish Match and the History of Sexuality; 5. Verse Collectors and Buckingham's Assassination; Epilogue: Redeploying Anti-Courtly Love Poetry Against the Protectorate; Appendix 1: Selected Verse Texts; Appendix 2: Manuscript Descriptions; Index of Manuscripts Cited; List of Printed Works Cited
General Index
Summary: This book reappraises the work of early-seventeenth-century collectors of English Renaissance poetry in manuscript. The verse miscellanies, or poetry anthologies, of these collectors have long attracted the attention of literary editors looking for texts by individual, major authors, and they have more recently interested historians for their poems on affairs of state, called verse libels. By contrast, this book investigates the relationships that the compilers of miscellaniesestablished between such presumably literary and political texts. It focuses on two of the most popular, and least printable, literary genres that they collected: libels, and anti-courtly love poetry, a literary mode that the collectors of John Donne''s poems played a major role in establishing. They madeDonne the most popular poet in manuscripts of the period, and they demonstrated a special affinity for his most erotic or obscene poems, such as ''To his Mistress going to bed'' and ''The Anagram''. Donne collectors also exhibited the similarities between these Ovidian love elegies and the sexually explicit or counter-Petrarchan verse of other authors, thereby organizing a literary genre opposed to the conventions of courtly love lyrics. Furthermore, collectors politicized this genre by relatingexamples of it to libels. In so doing, manuscript verse collectors demonstrated a type of literary and political activity distinct from that of authors, stationers, and readers. Based on a thorough investigation of manuscript verse miscellanies, the book appeals to scholars and students of early modernEnglish literature and history, Donne studies, manuscript studies, and the history of the book.
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PR545.L7 E24 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=728861 Available EBL728861

Contents; List of Abbreviations and Conventions; 1. The Literary and Political Activity of Manuscript Verse Collectors; 2. The Politics of Courtly and Anti-Courtly Love Poetry in the Hands of Collectors; 3. 'Love-song weeds, and Satyrique thornes': Anti-Courtly Love Poetry and Somerset Libels; 4. The Spanish Match and the History of Sexuality; 5. Verse Collectors and Buckingham's Assassination; Epilogue: Redeploying Anti-Courtly Love Poetry Against the Protectorate; Appendix 1: Selected Verse Texts; Appendix 2: Manuscript Descriptions; Index of Manuscripts Cited; List of Printed Works Cited

General Index

This book reappraises the work of early-seventeenth-century collectors of English Renaissance poetry in manuscript. The verse miscellanies, or poetry anthologies, of these collectors have long attracted the attention of literary editors looking for texts by individual, major authors, and they have more recently interested historians for their poems on affairs of state, called verse libels. By contrast, this book investigates the relationships that the compilers of miscellaniesestablished between such presumably literary and political texts. It focuses on two of the most popular, and least printable, literary genres that they collected: libels, and anti-courtly love poetry, a literary mode that the collectors of John Donne''s poems played a major role in establishing. They madeDonne the most popular poet in manuscripts of the period, and they demonstrated a special affinity for his most erotic or obscene poems, such as ''To his Mistress going to bed'' and ''The Anagram''. Donne collectors also exhibited the similarities between these Ovidian love elegies and the sexually explicit or counter-Petrarchan verse of other authors, thereby organizing a literary genre opposed to the conventions of courtly love lyrics. Furthermore, collectors politicized this genre by relatingexamples of it to libels. In so doing, manuscript verse collectors demonstrated a type of literary and political activity distinct from that of authors, stationers, and readers. Based on a thorough investigation of manuscript verse miscellanies, the book appeals to scholars and students of early modernEnglish literature and history, Donne studies, manuscript studies, and the history of the book.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Joshua Eckhardt teaches sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond.

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