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The Muse in Bronzeville : African American Creative Expression in Chicago, 1932-1950

By: Bone, Robert.
Contributor(s): Courage, Richard A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Piscataway : Rutgers University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (326 p.).ISBN: 9780813550732.Subject(s): African Americans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | American literature -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History and criticism | Chicago (Ill.) -- Intellectual life -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Muse in Bronzeville : African American Creative Expression in Chicago, 1932-1950DDC classification: 810.9 | 810.9977311 LOC classification: PS285 .C47 B66 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
contents; illustrations; foreword; preface; acknowledgments; Introduction; part one; chapter 1; chapter 2; chapter 3; part two; chapter 4; chapter 5; chapter 6; chapter 7; chapter 8; chapter 9; chapter 10; chapter 11; appendix a; appendix b; notes; selected bibliography; index
Summary: The Muse in Bronzeville, a dynamic reappraisal of a neglected period in African American cultural history, is the first comprehensive critical study of the creative awakening that occurred on Chicago''s South Side from the early 1930s to the cold war. Coming of age during the hard Depression years and in the wake of the Great Migration, this generation of Black creative artists produced works of literature, music, and visual art fully comparable in distinction and scope to the achievements of the Harlem Renaissance. This highly informative and accessible work, enhanced with reproductions of paintings of the same period, examines Black Chicago''s "Renaissance" through richly anecdotal profiles of such figures as Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Charles White, Gordon Parks, Horace Cayton, Muddy Waters, Mahalia Jackson, and Katherine Dunham. Robert Bone and Richard A. Courage make a powerful case for moving Chicago''s Bronzeville, long overshadowed by New York''s Harlem, from a peripheral to a central position within African American and American studies.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS285 .C47 B66 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=858960 Available EBL858960

contents; illustrations; foreword; preface; acknowledgments; Introduction; part one; chapter 1; chapter 2; chapter 3; part two; chapter 4; chapter 5; chapter 6; chapter 7; chapter 8; chapter 9; chapter 10; chapter 11; appendix a; appendix b; notes; selected bibliography; index

The Muse in Bronzeville, a dynamic reappraisal of a neglected period in African American cultural history, is the first comprehensive critical study of the creative awakening that occurred on Chicago''s South Side from the early 1930s to the cold war. Coming of age during the hard Depression years and in the wake of the Great Migration, this generation of Black creative artists produced works of literature, music, and visual art fully comparable in distinction and scope to the achievements of the Harlem Renaissance. This highly informative and accessible work, enhanced with reproductions of paintings of the same period, examines Black Chicago''s "Renaissance" through richly anecdotal profiles of such figures as Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Charles White, Gordon Parks, Horace Cayton, Muddy Waters, Mahalia Jackson, and Katherine Dunham. Robert Bone and Richard A. Courage make a powerful case for moving Chicago''s Bronzeville, long overshadowed by New York''s Harlem, from a peripheral to a central position within African American and American studies.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

What was the relationship between radical politics and black art, artists, and aesthetics in Chicago from 1932 to 1950? What accounts for the proliferation of literature, creative writing, visual arts, music, and dance in "Bronzeville," i.e., black Chicago, during this era? And how does this trans-art, cross-disciplinary movement intersect with the Harlem Renaissance? Bone (Columbia Univ. Teachers College until his death in 2007) and Courage (Westchester Community College, SUNY) answer these and other critical questions in this book. They offer not only an impressively astute and comprehensive explication of the historical, cultural, ideological, and foundational contours of the Chicago Renaissance, but also a discussion of the prominent figures (Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Gordon Parks, Mahalia Jackson, Katherine Dunham) and institutions that contributed to this black artistic flourishing in Chicago's South Side during the period from the "great migration" through the post-WW II moment. Foregrounding the renaissance in Chicago, which has been largely neglected and overshadowed by the Harlem Renaissance, this study delineates continuities and discontinuities and significantly expands understanding of black artistic renaissances (generally as well as area specific) and of cultural and expressive traditions collectively in 20th-century America. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. T. C. Melancon Loyola University

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