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Women Adrift : The Literature of Japan''s Imperial Body

By: Horiguchi, Noriko J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (270 p.).ISBN: 9780816678785.Subject(s): Fascist aesthetics -- Japan -- History -- 20th century | Human body in literature | Japanese literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Japanese literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Literature and society -- Japan -- History -- 20th century | National characteristics, Japanese, in literature | Women in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women Adrift : The Literature of Japan''s Imperial BodyDDC classification: 895.6/0992870904 | 895.60992870904 LOC classification: PL725 .H67 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction: Japanese Women and Imperial Expansion; 1. Japan as a Body; 2. The Universal Womb; 3. Resistance and Conformity; 4. Behind the Guns: Yosano Akiko; 5. Self-Imposed Exile: Tamura Toshiko; 6. Wandering on the Periphery: Hayashi Fumiko; Conclusion: From Literary to Visual Memory of Empire; Acknowledgments; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: Women's bodies contributed to the expansion of the Japanese empire. With this bold opening, Noriko J. Horiguchi sets out in Women Adrift to show how women's actions and representations of women's bodies redrew the border and expanded, rather than transcended, the empire of Japan. Discussions of empire building in Japan routinely employ the idea of kokutai-the national body-as a way of conceptualizing Japan as a nation-state. Women Adrift demonstrates how women impacted this notion, and how women's actions affected perceptions of the national body. Horiguchi broadens the debate over Japanese women's agency by focusing on works that move between naichi, the inner territory of the empire of Japan, and gaichi, the outer territory; specifically, she analyzes the boundary-crossing writings of three prominent female authors: Yosano Akiko (1878-1942), Tamura Toshiko (1884-1945), and Hayashi Fumiko (1904-1951). In these examples-and in Naruse Mikio's postwar film adaptations of Hayashi's work-Horiguchi reveals how these writers asserted their own agency by transgressing the borders of nation and gender. At the same time, we see how their work, conducted under various colonial conditions, ended up reinforcing Japanese nationalism, racialism, and imperial expansion. In her reappraisal of the paradoxical positions of these women writers, Horiguchi complicates narratives of Japanese empire and of women's role in its expansion.
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PL723 .K42 2010 So Lovely a Country Will Never Perish : PL723 .K42 2010 So lovely a country will never perish : PL725 | PL725 .S89 2010 | PL725.S89 2010 Becoming Modern Women : PL725 .H67 2011 Women Adrift : PL725.2.W65 P47 2014 Recasting Red culture in proletarian Japan : PL726 The Rise and Fall of Modern Japanese Literature. PL726 | PL726.2 .O42 1992 Figures of Resistance

Cover; Contents; Introduction: Japanese Women and Imperial Expansion; 1. Japan as a Body; 2. The Universal Womb; 3. Resistance and Conformity; 4. Behind the Guns: Yosano Akiko; 5. Self-Imposed Exile: Tamura Toshiko; 6. Wandering on the Periphery: Hayashi Fumiko; Conclusion: From Literary to Visual Memory of Empire; Acknowledgments; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

Women's bodies contributed to the expansion of the Japanese empire. With this bold opening, Noriko J. Horiguchi sets out in Women Adrift to show how women's actions and representations of women's bodies redrew the border and expanded, rather than transcended, the empire of Japan. Discussions of empire building in Japan routinely employ the idea of kokutai-the national body-as a way of conceptualizing Japan as a nation-state. Women Adrift demonstrates how women impacted this notion, and how women's actions affected perceptions of the national body. Horiguchi broadens the debate over Japanese women's agency by focusing on works that move between naichi, the inner territory of the empire of Japan, and gaichi, the outer territory; specifically, she analyzes the boundary-crossing writings of three prominent female authors: Yosano Akiko (1878-1942), Tamura Toshiko (1884-1945), and Hayashi Fumiko (1904-1951). In these examples-and in Naruse Mikio's postwar film adaptations of Hayashi's work-Horiguchi reveals how these writers asserted their own agency by transgressing the borders of nation and gender. At the same time, we see how their work, conducted under various colonial conditions, ended up reinforcing Japanese nationalism, racialism, and imperial expansion. In her reappraisal of the paradoxical positions of these women writers, Horiguchi complicates narratives of Japanese empire and of women's role in its expansion.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this straightforward, lucid, thorough study, Horiguchi (Univ. of Tennessee) argues that women's bodies, as represented in the work of three prominent writers and by the writers themselves, helped expand the Japanese empire. She analyzes how Yosano Akiko, Tamura Toshiko, and Hayashi Fumiko and their female characters transgress state ideology on sexuality and gender in the inner territory of the empire, yet participate in imperial expansion in the outer territory. In chapter 1, Horiguchi establishes her case by explaining the rationale of body as metaphor (body politic of the empire, bodies of subjects). In the second chapter she discusses the assignment of women's bodies in the empire (reproduction, labor, migration), and in the third provides examples of activists and artists resisting and conforming to state discourse on women's bodies. Horiguchi builds on this foundation in interrogating the three writers and their work. She conscientiously discusses conclusions of other scholarship (e.g., Joan Ericson's Be a Woman, CH, Oct'98, 36-0782; Janine Beichman's Embracing the Firebird, CH, May'03, 40-5060) and how they differ from or overlap hers. A final chapter on filmmaker Naruse Mikio's cinematic versions of Hayshi's stories provides yet another perspective. This study enables readers to consider these writers in a new and fresh light. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. L. I. Winston independent scholar

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