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Tiananmen Fictions outside the Square : The Chinese Literary Diaspora and the Politics of Global Culture

By: Kong, Belinda.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Asian American History & Cultu: Publisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (290 p.).ISBN: 9781439907603.Subject(s): Authors, Chinese - Foreign countries | China - History - Tiananmen Square Incident, 1989 | Chinese diaspora in literature | Chinese fiction | Chinese literature - Foreign countries - History and criticism | Chinese literature -- Foreign countries -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Tiananmen Fictions outside the Square : The Chinese Literary Diaspora and the Politics of Global CultureDDC classification: 895.1/3009 | 895.15209 LOC classification: PL3033PL3033.K66 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Tiananmen in Diaspora and in Fiction; 1. The Existentialist Square: Gao Xingjian's Taowang; Part I. The Prize and the Polis; Part II. Fleeing Tiananmen; 2. The Aporetic Square: Ha Jin's The Crazed; Part I. The Scholar and the Student; Part II. The Lost Square; 3. The Globalized Square: Annie Wang's Lili; Part I. Female Hooligans and Global Capital; Part II. Equivocal Transnationalism; 4. The Biopolitical Square: Ma Jian's Beijing Coma; Part I. Tiananmen Cannibals and Biopower; Part II. Reclaiming Student Life and After
Conclusion: The Square Comes Full CircleNotes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: An exciting analysis of the myriad literary effects of Tiananmen, Belinda Kong''s Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square is the first full-length study of fictions related to the 1989 movement and massacre. More than any other episode in recent world history, Tiananmen has brought a distinctly politicized Chinese literary diaspora into stark relief. Kong redefines Tiananmen''s meaning from an event that ended in local political failure to one that succeeded in producing a vital dimension of contemporary transnational writing today. She spotlights key writers-Gao Xingjian, Ha Jin, Annie Wang, and Ma Jian-who have written and published about the massacre from abroad. Their outsider/distanced perspectives inform their work, and reveal how diaspora writers continually reimagine Tiananmen''s relevance to the post-1989 world at large.Compelling us to think about how Chinese culture, identity, and politics are being defined in the diaspora, Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square candidly addresses issues of political exile, historical trauma, global capital, and state biopower. 
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PL3033 | PL3033.K66 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=887890 Available EBL887890

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Tiananmen in Diaspora and in Fiction; 1. The Existentialist Square: Gao Xingjian's Taowang; Part I. The Prize and the Polis; Part II. Fleeing Tiananmen; 2. The Aporetic Square: Ha Jin's The Crazed; Part I. The Scholar and the Student; Part II. The Lost Square; 3. The Globalized Square: Annie Wang's Lili; Part I. Female Hooligans and Global Capital; Part II. Equivocal Transnationalism; 4. The Biopolitical Square: Ma Jian's Beijing Coma; Part I. Tiananmen Cannibals and Biopower; Part II. Reclaiming Student Life and After

Conclusion: The Square Comes Full CircleNotes; Bibliography; Index

An exciting analysis of the myriad literary effects of Tiananmen, Belinda Kong''s Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square is the first full-length study of fictions related to the 1989 movement and massacre. More than any other episode in recent world history, Tiananmen has brought a distinctly politicized Chinese literary diaspora into stark relief. Kong redefines Tiananmen''s meaning from an event that ended in local political failure to one that succeeded in producing a vital dimension of contemporary transnational writing today. She spotlights key writers-Gao Xingjian, Ha Jin, Annie Wang, and Ma Jian-who have written and published about the massacre from abroad. Their outsider/distanced perspectives inform their work, and reveal how diaspora writers continually reimagine Tiananmen''s relevance to the post-1989 world at large.Compelling us to think about how Chinese culture, identity, and politics are being defined in the diaspora, Tiananmen Fictions Outside the Square candidly addresses issues of political exile, historical trauma, global capital, and state biopower. 

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This penetrating, well-theorized, lucid book is the first to ponder the global literary impact of "Tiananmen," now the generally accepted shorthand term for the 1989 Beijing democracy movement and the army massacre that ended it. Kong (Asian studies and English, Bowdoin College) provides close readings of four Tiananmen-related works--three novels and a play--by Chinese-born writers Gao Xingjian (2000 Nobelist in literature), Ha Jin, Ma Jian, and Annie Wang. Talk of "Tiananmen" is taboo in China, so these works were written and published abroad, for audiences outside China. Ha Jin and Wang write fiction in English. Although the four works analyzed are not eyewitness accounts or (in the case of Gao and Ha Jin) among the author's signature compositions, Tiananmen redirected the literary mission of all four writers, redefining them as diasporic interpreters of China, Kong argues. Comparing their literary works with others' controversial films and nonfiction accounts, the author explores the protest movement's leadership and tactics, still-contested facts about the bloodshed, how Tiananmen changed Chinese history and art, and how it further globalized and politicized the Chinese literary diaspora. All four authors, being movement outsiders, see Tiananmen as a fated tragedy, not a crushed moment of promise. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above; general readers. J. C. Kinkley St. John's University (NY)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Belinda Kong is Assistant Professor of Asian Studies and English at Bowdoin College.</p>

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